↓ Skip to main content

Complete or partial reduction of the Met receptor tyrosine kinase in distinct circuits differentially impacts mouse behavior

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders, November 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (82nd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
23 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Complete or partial reduction of the Met receptor tyrosine kinase in distinct circuits differentially impacts mouse behavior
Published in
Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders, November 2015
DOI 10.1186/s11689-015-9131-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Barbara L. Thompson, Pat Levitt

Abstract

Our laboratory discovered that the gene encoding the receptor tyrosine kinase, MET, contributes to autism risk. Expression of MET is reduced in human postmortem temporal lobe in autism and Rett Syndrome. Subsequent studies revealed a role for MET in human and mouse functional and structural cortical connectivity. To further understand the contribution of Met to brain development and its impact on behavior, we generated two conditional mouse lines in which Met is deleted from select populations of central nervous system neurons. Mice were then tested to determine the consequences of disrupting Met expression. Mating of Emx1 (cre) and Met (fx/fx) mice eliminates receptor signaling from all cells arising from the dorsal pallium. Met (fx/fx) and Nestin (cre) crosses result in receptor signaling elimination from all neural cells. Behavioral tests were performed to assess cognitive, emotional, and social impairments that are observed in multiple neurodevelopmental disorders and that are in part subserved by circuits that express Met. Met (fx/fx) /Emx1 (cre) null mice displayed significant hypoactivity in the activity chamber and in the T-maze despite superior performance on the rotarod. Additionally, these animals showed a deficit in spontaneous alternation. Surprisingly, Met (fx/fx; fx/+) /Nestin (cre) null and heterozygous mice exhibited deficits in contextual fear conditioning, and Met (fx/+) /Nestin (cre) heterozygous mice spent less time in the closed arms of the elevated plus maze. These data suggest a complex contribution of Met in the development of circuits mediating social, emotional, and cognitive behavior. The impact of disrupting developmental Met expression is dependent upon circuit-specific deletion patterns and levels of receptor activity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 23 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 30%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 22%
Student > Master 3 13%
Unspecified 1 4%
Student > Bachelor 1 4%
Other 2 9%
Unknown 4 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 4 17%
Psychology 3 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 9%
Other 5 22%
Unknown 5 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 November 2015.
All research outputs
#1,837,048
of 12,528,744 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders
#76
of 267 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#48,698
of 275,185 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders
#5
of 28 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,528,744 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 267 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,185 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 28 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.