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Multiple estimates of effective population size for monitoring a long-lived vertebrate: an application to Yellowstone grizzly bears

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Ecology, October 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
5 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
7 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
20 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
105 Mendeley
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Title
Multiple estimates of effective population size for monitoring a long-lived vertebrate: an application to Yellowstone grizzly bears
Published in
Molecular Ecology, October 2015
DOI 10.1111/mec.13398
Pubmed ID
Authors

Pauline L. Kamath, Mark A. Haroldson, Gordon Luikart, David Paetkau, Craig Whitman, Frank T. van Manen

Abstract

Effective population size (Ne ) is a key parameter for monitoring the genetic health of threatened populations because it reflects a population's evolutionary potential and risk of extinction due to genetic stochasticity. However, its application to wildlife monitoring has been limited because it is difficult to measure in natural populations. The isolated and well-studied population of grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem provides a rare opportunity to examine the usefulness of different Ne estimators for monitoring. We genotyped 729 Yellowstone grizzly bears using 20 microsatellites and applied three single-sample estimators to examine contemporary trends in generation interval (GI), effective number of breeders (Nb ) and Ne during 1982-2007. We also used multisample methods to estimate variance (NeV ) and inbreeding Ne (NeI ). Single-sample estimates revealed positive trajectories, with over a fourfold increase in Ne (≈100 to 450) and near doubling of the GI (≈8 to 14) from the 1980s to 2000s. NeV (240-319) and NeI (256) were comparable with the harmonic mean single-sample Ne (213) over the time period. Reanalysing historical data, we found NeV increased from ≈80 in the 1910s-1960s to ≈280 in the contemporary population. The estimated ratio of effective to total census size (Ne /Nc ) was stable and high (0.42-0.66) compared to previous brown bear studies. These results support independent demographic evidence for Yellowstone grizzly bear population growth since the 1980s. They further demonstrate how genetic monitoring of Ne can complement demographic-based monitoring of Nc and vital rates, providing a valuable tool for wildlife managers.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 105 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Chile 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 101 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 25 24%
Researcher 18 17%
Student > Master 18 17%
Student > Bachelor 11 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 10%
Other 23 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 68 65%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 16 15%
Environmental Science 9 9%
Unspecified 6 6%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 2%
Other 4 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 59. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 November 2016.
All research outputs
#242,113
of 12,354,212 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Ecology
#71
of 4,162 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,717
of 264,677 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Ecology
#4
of 141 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,354,212 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,162 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,677 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 141 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.