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Rising morbidity and mortality in midlife among white non-Hispanic Americans in the 21st century

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, November 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#5 of 76,796)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Citations

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485 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
709 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Rising morbidity and mortality in midlife among white non-Hispanic Americans in the 21st century
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, November 2015
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1518393112
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anne Case, Angus Deaton

Abstract

This paper documents a marked increase in the all-cause mortality of middle-aged white non-Hispanic men and women in the United States between 1999 and 2013. This change reversed decades of progress in mortality and was unique to the United States; no other rich country saw a similar turnaround. The midlife mortality reversal was confined to white non-Hispanics; black non-Hispanics and Hispanics at midlife, and those aged 65 and above in every racial and ethnic group, continued to see mortality rates fall. This increase for whites was largely accounted for by increasing death rates from drug and alcohol poisonings, suicide, and chronic liver diseases and cirrhosis. Although all education groups saw increases in mortality from suicide and poisonings, and an overall increase in external cause mortality, those with less education saw the most marked increases. Rising midlife mortality rates of white non-Hispanics were paralleled by increases in midlife morbidity. Self-reported declines in health, mental health, and ability to conduct activities of daily living, and increases in chronic pain and inability to work, as well as clinically measured deteriorations in liver function, all point to growing distress in this population. We comment on potential economic causes and consequences of this deterioration.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 1,060 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 709 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 34 5%
United Kingdom 8 1%
Canada 2 <1%
Luxembourg 1 <1%
Israel 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Finland 1 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
Other 9 1%
Unknown 650 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 167 24%
Researcher 110 16%
Student > Master 105 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 59 8%
Professor 55 8%
Other 212 30%
Unknown 1 <1%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 197 28%
Medicine and Dentistry 121 17%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 97 14%
Unspecified 71 10%
Psychology 51 7%
Other 171 24%
Unknown 1 <1%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3945. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 November 2018.
All research outputs
#82
of 12,149,178 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#5
of 76,796 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1
of 252,609 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#1
of 914 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,149,178 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 76,796 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 252,609 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 914 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.