↓ Skip to main content

Chest shielding for prevention of a haemodynamically significant patent ductus arteriosus in preterm infants receiving phototherapy

Overview of attention for article published in Cochrane database of systematic reviews, November 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
3 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
3 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
64 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Chest shielding for prevention of a haemodynamically significant patent ductus arteriosus in preterm infants receiving phototherapy
Published in
Cochrane database of systematic reviews, November 2015
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd009816.pub2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kavita Bhola, Jann P Foster, David A Osborn

Abstract

Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) is associated with mortality and morbidity in preterm infants. Phototherapy is a common treatment for jaundice in preterm infants. However, phototherapy has been associated with failure of closure of the ductus arteriosus in preterm infants. To determine if chest shielding of preterm infants receiving phototherapy reduces the incidence of clinically and/or haemodynamically significant PDA and reduces morbidity secondary to PDA. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (the Cochrane Library; 2015, Issue 3), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, previous reviews, cross-references, abstracts, proceedings of scientific meetings, and trial registries through March 2015. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), cluster-RCTs, or quasi-RCTs of chest shielding during phototherapy compared to sham shielding or no shielding for the prevention of a haemodynamically or clinically significant PDA in preterm infants. Three review authors independently assessed studies for eligibility and quality and extracted data. We defined a clinically significant PDA as the presence of a PDA with clinical signs of an effect on organ function attributable to the ductus arteriosus. We defined a haemodynamically significant PDA as clinical and/or echocardiographic signs of a significant ductus arteriosus effect on blood flow. We included two small trials enrolling very preterm infants (Rosenfeld 1986; Travadi 2006). We assessed both as at high risk of bias. No study reported clinically significant PDA, defined as the presence of a PDA with clinical symptoms or signs attributable to the effect of a ductus arteriosus on organ function. Rosenfeld 1986 reported a non-significant reduction in haemodynamically significant PDA with left atrial to aortic root ratio greater than 1.2 (risk ratio (RR) 0.23, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.05 to 1.01; 74 infants) but a statistically significant risk difference (RD -0.18, 95% CI -0.34 to -0.03; number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNTB) 5, 95% CI 3 to 33). Rosenfeld 1986 reported a significant reduction in PDA detected by murmur (RR 0.50, 95% CI 0.29 to 0.88; RD -0.30, 95% CI -0.52 to -0.08; NNTB 3, 95% CI 2 to 12; 74 infants). Rosenfeld 1986 reported a significant reduction in treatment with indomethacin (RR 0.12, 95% CI 0.02 to 0.88; RD -0.21, 95% CI -0.35 to -0.06; NNTB 5, 95% CI 3 to 17; 74 infants), and only one infant had a ductal ligation in the no-shield group. There were no other significant outcomes, including mortality to discharge or 28 days, days in oxygen, days on mechanical ventilation, days in hospital, intraventricular haemorrhage, retinopathy of prematurity, or exchange transfusion. The available evidence is very low quality and insufficient to assess the safety or efficacy of chest shield during phototherapy for prevention of PDA in preterm infants. Further trials of chest shielding are warranted, particularly in settings where infants are not receiving prophylactic or early echocardiographic targeted cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors for PDA.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 64 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 64 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 13%
Student > Bachelor 8 13%
Researcher 7 11%
Other 5 8%
Other 10 16%
Unknown 17 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 28 44%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 17%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 3%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 2%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 2%
Other 3 5%
Unknown 18 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 March 2016.
All research outputs
#1,059,775
of 12,527,219 outputs
Outputs from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#3,230
of 8,923 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#32,312
of 275,472 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#119
of 246 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,527,219 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,923 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,472 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 246 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.