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BAG3 promotes pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma growth by activating stromal macrophages

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Communications, November 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (63rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
11 tweeters
patent
1 patent
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
39 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
71 Mendeley
Title
BAG3 promotes pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma growth by activating stromal macrophages
Published in
Nature Communications, November 2015
DOI 10.1038/ncomms9695
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alessandra Rosati, Anna Basile, Raffaella D’Auria, Morena d’Avenia, Margot De Marco, Antonia Falco, Michelina Festa, Luana Guerriero, Vittoria Iorio, Roberto Parente, Maria Pascale, Liberato Marzullo, Renato Franco, Claudio Arra, Antonio Barbieri, Domenica Rea, Giulio Menichini, Michael Hahne, Maarten Bijlsma, Daniela Barcaroli, Gianluca Sala, Fabio Francesco di Mola, Pierluigi di Sebastiano, Jelena Todoric, Laura Antonucci, Vincent Corvest, Anass Jawhari, Matthew A Firpo, David A Tuveson, Mario Capunzo, Michael Karin, Vincenzo De Laurenzi, Maria Caterina Turco

Abstract

The incidence and death rate of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) have increased in recent years, therefore the identification of novel targets for treatment is extremely important. Interactions between cancer and stromal cells are critically involved in tumour formation and development of metastasis. Here we report that PDAC cells secrete BAG3, which binds and activates macrophages, inducing their activation and the secretion of PDAC supporting factors. We also identify IFITM-2 as a BAG3 receptor and show that it signals through PI3K and the p38 MAPK pathways. Finally, we show that the use of an anti-BAG3 antibody results in reduced tumour growth and prevents metastasis formation in three different mouse models. In conclusion, we identify a paracrine loop involved in PDAC growth and metastatic spreading, and show that an anti-BAG3 antibody has therapeutic potential.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 71 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 1%
Unknown 70 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 17 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 21%
Other 7 10%
Student > Postgraduate 5 7%
Student > Bachelor 5 7%
Other 14 20%
Unknown 8 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 20 28%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 19 27%
Immunology and Microbiology 7 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 10%
Chemistry 3 4%
Other 5 7%
Unknown 10 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 21. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 October 2019.
All research outputs
#835,737
of 14,162,689 outputs
Outputs from Nature Communications
#10,857
of 26,309 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#23,018
of 284,494 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Communications
#819
of 2,223 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,162,689 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 26,309 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 48.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 284,494 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2,223 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.