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Prescription Stimulants and PTSD Among U. S. Military Service Members

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Traumatic Stress, November 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (61st percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
7 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
41 Mendeley
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Title
Prescription Stimulants and PTSD Among U. S. Military Service Members
Published in
Journal of Traumatic Stress, November 2015
DOI 10.1002/jts.22052
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nancy F. Crum-Cianflone, Melissa A. Frasco, Richard F. Armenta, Christopher J. Phillips, Jaime Horton, Margaret A. K. Ryan, Dale W. Russell, Cynthia LeardMann

Abstract

Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a prevalent condition among military service members and civilians who have experienced traumatic events. Stimulant use has been postulated to increase the risk of incident PTSD; however, research in this area is lacking. In this study, the association between receipt of prescription stimulants and PTSD was examined in a secondary analysis among active duty U.S. military members (n = 25,971), participating in the Millennium Cohort Study, who completed a baseline (2001-2003) and two follow-up surveys (between 2004-2008). Prescription stimulant data were obtained from the military Pharmacy Data Transaction Service. PTSD was assessed using the PTSD Checklist-Civilian Version and incident PTSD was defined as meeting the criteria at follow-up among those who did not have a history of PTSD at baseline. Overall, 1,215 (4.7%) persons developed new-onset PTSD during follow-up. Receipt of prescription stimulants were significantly associated with incident PTSD, hazard ratio = 5.09, 95% confidence interval [3.05, 8.50], after adjusting for sociodemographic factors, military characteristics, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, baseline mental and physical health status, deployment experiences, and physical/sexual trauma. Findings suggested that prescription stimulants are associated with incident PTSD among military personnel; these data may inform the underlying pathogenesis of and preventive strategies for PTSD.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 41 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 41 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 15%
Student > Master 5 12%
Student > Bachelor 4 10%
Researcher 4 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 7%
Other 11 27%
Unknown 8 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 14 34%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 7%
Social Sciences 3 7%
Neuroscience 2 5%
Other 4 10%
Unknown 11 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 January 2020.
All research outputs
#4,468,078
of 17,358,590 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Traumatic Stress
#532
of 1,451 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#72,935
of 291,242 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Traumatic Stress
#7
of 18 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,358,590 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,451 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 291,242 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 18 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.