↓ Skip to main content

Socioeconomic diversities and infant development at 6 to 9 months in a poverty area of São Paulo, Brazil

Overview of attention for article published in Trends in Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, August 2018
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
3 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
65 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Socioeconomic diversities and infant development at 6 to 9 months in a poverty area of São Paulo, Brazil
Published in
Trends in Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, August 2018
DOI 10.1590/2237-6089-2017-0008
Pubmed ID
Authors

Patricia Tella, Luciane da Rosa Piccolo, Mayra Lemus Rangel, Luis Augusto Rohde, Guilherme Vanoni Polanczyk, Euripides Constantino Miguel, Sandra Josefina Ferraz Ellero Grisi, Bacy Fleitlich-Bilyk, Alexandre Archanjo Ferraro

Abstract

The effects of socioeconomic disparities on cognitive development tend to emerge early in infancy and to widen throughout childhood, and may perpetuate later in life. Although the study of how poverty affects early childhood has increased in the last 20 years, many of the effects remain largely unknown, especially during the first year of life. To investigate the influence of socioeconomic status (SES) and maternal education on infants' language, motor and cognitive development. The cognitive, language and motor skills of 444 infants aged 6 to 9 months selected from a poor neighborhood in São Paulo, Brazil, were evaluated using the Bayley Scales of Infant Development. A questionnaire on socioeconomic background was administered to the participants' families. A positive association was found between SES and infants' performance on language and motor scales. Additionally, higher maternal education was associated with higher language and cognitive scores. Our findings indicate that SES effects are detectable very early in infancy. This result has implications for the timing of both screening and intervention efforts to help children overcome the consequences of living in poverty.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 65 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 65 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 23%
Student > Bachelor 5 8%
Researcher 4 6%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 6%
Student > Postgraduate 3 5%
Other 16 25%
Unknown 18 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 13 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 14%
Psychology 6 9%
Social Sciences 5 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 3%
Other 10 15%
Unknown 20 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 November 2018.
All research outputs
#7,957,174
of 13,845,249 outputs
Outputs from Trends in Psychiatry and Psychotherapy
#25
of 85 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#139,693
of 271,165 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Trends in Psychiatry and Psychotherapy
#1
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,845,249 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 85 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,165 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them