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Antenatal Vitamin D Status Is Not Associated with Standard Neurodevelopmental Assessments at Age 5 Years in a Well-Characterized Prospective Maternal-Infant Cohort

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Nutrition, August 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (79th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
23 tweeters

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

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42 Mendeley
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Title
Antenatal Vitamin D Status Is Not Associated with Standard Neurodevelopmental Assessments at Age 5 Years in a Well-Characterized Prospective Maternal-Infant Cohort
Published in
Journal of Nutrition, August 2018
DOI 10.1093/jn/nxy150
Pubmed ID
Authors

Elaine K McCarthy, Deirdre M Murray, Lucio Malvisi, Louise C Kenny, Jonathan O'B Hourihane, Alan D Irvine, Mairead E Kiely

Abstract

Although animal studies show evidence for a role of vitamin D during brain development, data from human studies show conflicting signals. We aimed to explore associations between maternal and neonatal vitamin D status with childhood neurodevelopmental outcomes. Comprehensive clinical, demographic, and lifestyle data were collected prospectively in 734 maternal-infant dyads from the Cork BASELINE Birth Cohort Study. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations were quantified at 15 weeks of gestation and in umbilical cord sera at birth via a CDC-accredited liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. Children were assessed at age 5 y through the use of the Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test (2nd Edition, KBIT-2) and the Child Behaviour Checklist (CBCL). Linear regression was used to explore associations between 25(OH)D and neurodevelopmental outcomes. 25(OH)D concentrations were <30 nmol/L in 15% of maternal and 45% of umbilical cord sera and <50 nmol/L in 42% of mothers and 80% of cords. At age 5 y, the mean ± SD KBIT-2 intelligence quotient (IQ) composite score was 104.6 ± 8.6; scores were 107.2 ± 10.0 in verbal and 99.8 ± 8.8 in nonverbal tasks. Developmental delay (scores <85) was seen in <3% of children across all domains. The mean ± SD CBCL total problem score was 21.3 ± 17.5; scores in the abnormal/clinical range for internal, external, and total problem scales were present in 12%, 4%, and 6% of participants, respectively. KBIT-2 and CBCL subscale scores at 5 y were not different between children exposed to low antenatal vitamin D status, either at 30 or 50 nmol/L 25(OH)D thresholds. Neither maternal nor cord 25(OH)D (per 10 nmol/L) were associated with KBIT-2 IQ composite scores [adjusted β (95% CI): maternal -0.01 (-0.03, 0.02); cord 0.01 (-0.03, 0.04] or CBCL total problem scores [maternal 0.01 (-0.04, 0.05); cord 0.01 (-0.07, 0.09)]. In this well-characterized prospective maternal-infant cohort, we found no evidence that antenatal 25(OH)D concentrations are associated with neurodevelopmental outcomes at 5 y. The BASELINE Study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01498965; the SCOPE Study was registered at http://www.anzctr.org.au as ACTRN12607000551493.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 23 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 42 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 19%
Researcher 8 19%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 10%
Student > Bachelor 2 5%
Other 2 5%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 15 36%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 24%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 5%
Neuroscience 2 5%
Social Sciences 2 5%
Psychology 2 5%
Other 5 12%
Unknown 19 45%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 21. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 November 2020.
All research outputs
#1,126,006
of 17,614,750 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Nutrition
#1,006
of 8,702 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#29,512
of 282,956 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Nutrition
#16
of 73 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,614,750 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,702 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 282,956 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 73 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.