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Addressing health disparities in Hispanic breast cancer: accurate and inexpensive sequencing of BRCA1 and BRCA2

Overview of attention for article published in Giga Science, November 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
7 tweeters
peer_reviews
1 peer review site
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
28 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
53 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Addressing health disparities in Hispanic breast cancer: accurate and inexpensive sequencing of BRCA1 and BRCA2
Published in
Giga Science, November 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13742-015-0088-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Michael Dean, Joseph Boland, Meredith Yeager, Kate M. Im, Lisa Garland, Maria Rodriguez-Herrera, Mylen Perez, Jason Mitchell, David Roberson, Kristine Jones, Hyo Jung Lee, Rebecca Eggebeen, Julie Sawitzke, Sara Bass, Xijun Zhang, Vivian Robles, Celia Hollis, Claudia Barajas, Edna Rath, Candy Arentz, Jose A. Figueroa, Diane D. Nguyen, Zeina Nahleh

Abstract

Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes account for 20-25 % of inherited breast cancers and about 10 % of all breast cancer cases. Detection of BRCA mutation carriers can lead to therapeutic interventions such as mastectomy, oophorectomy, hormonal prevention therapy, improved screening, and targeted therapies such as PARP-inhibition. We estimate that African Americans and Hispanics are 4-5 times less likely to receive BRCA screening, despite having similar mutation frequencies as non-Jewish Caucasians, who have higher breast cancer mortality. To begin addressing this health disparity, we initiated a nationwide trial of BRCA testing of Latin American women with breast cancer. Patients were recruited through community organizations, clinics, public events, and by mail and Internet. Subjects completed the consent process and questionnaire, and provided a saliva sample by mail or in person. DNA from 120 subjects was used to sequence the entirety of BRCA1 and BRCA2 coding regions and splice sites, and validate pathogenic mutations, with a total material cost of $85/subject. Subjects ranged in age from 23 to 81 years (mean age, 51 years), 6 % had bilateral disease, 57 % were ER/PR+, 23 % HER2+, and 17 % had triple-negative disease. A total of seven different predicted deleterious mutations were identified, one newly described and the rest rare. In addition, four variants of unknown effect were found. Application of this strategy on a larger scale could lead to improved cancer care of minority and underserved populations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 53 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 53 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 11%
Researcher 5 9%
Other 4 8%
Other 15 28%
Unknown 8 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 21%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 4%
Computer Science 2 4%
Other 7 13%
Unknown 10 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 34. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 April 2020.
All research outputs
#600,788
of 15,140,715 outputs
Outputs from Giga Science
#142
of 720 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#16,135
of 286,116 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Giga Science
#13
of 65 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,140,715 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 720 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 286,116 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 65 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.