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Malignant Transformation of Hymenolepis nana in a Human Host.

Overview of attention for article published in New England Journal of Medicine, November 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Readers on

mendeley
100 Mendeley
Title
Malignant Transformation of Hymenolepis nana in a Human Host.
Published in
New England Journal of Medicine, November 2015
DOI 10.1056/nejmoa1505892
Pubmed ID
Authors

Muehlenbachs, Atis, Bhatnagar, Julu, Agudelo, Carlos A, Hidron, Alicia, Eberhard, Mark L, Mathison, Blaine A, Frace, Michael A, Ito, Akira, Metcalfe, Maureen G, Rollin, Dominique C, Visvesvara, Govinda S, Pham, Cau D, Jones, Tara L, Greer, Patricia W, Vélez Hoyos, Alejandro, Olson, Peter D, Diazgranados, Lucy R, Zaki, Sherif R, Atis Muehlenbachs, Julu Bhatnagar, Carlos A. Agudelo, Alicia Hidron, Mark L. Eberhard, Blaine A. Mathison, Michael A. Frace, Akira Ito, Maureen G. Metcalfe, Dominique C. Rollin, Govinda S. Visvesvara, Cau D. Pham, Tara L. Jones, Patricia W. Greer, Alejandro Vélez Hoyos, Peter D. Olson, Lucy R. Diazgranados, Sherif R. Zaki, Agudelo, Carlos A., Eberhard, Mark L., Mathison, Blaine A., Frace, Michael A., Metcalfe, Maureen G., Rollin, Dominique C., Visvesvara, Govinda S., Pham, Cau D., Jones, Tara L., Greer, Patricia W., Olson, Peter D., Diazgranados, Lucy R., Zaki, Sherif R.

Abstract

Neoplasms occur naturally in invertebrates but are not known to develop in tapeworms. We observed nests of monomorphic, undifferentiated cells in samples from lymph-node and lung biopsies in a man infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The morphologic features and invasive behavior of the cells were characteristic of cancer, but their small size suggested a nonhuman origin. A polymerase-chain-reaction (PCR) assay targeting eukaryotes identified Hymenolepis nana DNA. Although the cells were unrecognizable as tapeworm tissue, immunohistochemical staining and probe hybridization labeled the cells in situ. Comparative deep sequencing identified H. nana structural genomic variants that are compatible with mutations described in cancer. Invasion of human tissue by abnormal, proliferating, genetically altered tapeworm cells is a novel disease mechanism that links infection and cancer.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 730 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 100 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 6 6%
Brazil 2 2%
Canada 2 2%
Japan 2 2%
Peru 1 1%
France 1 1%
Italy 1 1%
Belgium 1 1%
Sweden 1 1%
Other 5 5%
Unknown 78 78%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 27 27%
Researcher 20 20%
Student > Bachelor 14 14%
Student > Master 12 12%
Other 9 9%
Other 18 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 42 42%
Medicine and Dentistry 39 39%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 5%
Chemistry 3 3%
Chemical Engineering 2 2%
Other 9 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1302. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 June 2017.
All research outputs
#864
of 7,945,514 outputs
Outputs from New England Journal of Medicine
#52
of 19,623 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#42
of 243,266 outputs
Outputs of similar age from New England Journal of Medicine
#1
of 392 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,945,514 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 19,623 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 46.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 243,266 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 392 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.