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The Negative Association between Religiousness and Children’s Altruism across the World

Overview of attention for article published in Current Biology, November 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#6 of 6,769)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
80 news outlets
blogs
21 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
1357 tweeters
peer_reviews
1 peer review site
facebook
24 Facebook pages
googleplus
54 Google+ users
reddit
11 Redditors

Readers on

mendeley
368 Mendeley
citeulike
4 CiteULike
Title
The Negative Association between Religiousness and Children’s Altruism across the World
Published in
Current Biology, November 2015
DOI 10.1016/j.cub.2015.09.056
Pubmed ID
Authors

Decety, Jean, Cowell, Jason M, Lee, Kang, Mahasneh, Randa, Malcolm-Smith, Susan, Selcuk, Bilge, Zhou, Xinyue, Jean Decety, Jason M. Cowell, Kang Lee, Randa Mahasneh, Susan Malcolm-Smith, Bilge Selcuk, Xinyue Zhou, Jason M Cowell

Abstract

Prosocial behaviors are ubiquitous across societies. They emerge early in ontogeny [1] and are shaped by interactions between genes and culture [2, 3]. Over the course of middle childhood, sharing approaches equality in distribution [4]. Since 5.8 billion humans, representing 84% of the worldwide population, identify as religious [5], religion is arguably one prevalent facet of culture that influences the development and expression of prosociality. While it is generally accepted that religion contours people's moral judgments and prosocial behavior, the relation between religiosity and morality is a contentious one. Here, we assessed altruism and third-party evaluation of scenarios depicting interpersonal harm in 1,170 children aged between 5 and 12 years in six countries (Canada, China, Jordan, Turkey, USA, and South Africa), the religiousness of their household, and parent-reported child empathy and sensitivity to justice. Across all countries, parents in religious households reported that their children expressed more empathy and sensitivity for justice in everyday life than non-religious parents. However, religiousness was inversely predictive of children's altruism and positively correlated with their punitive tendencies. Together these results reveal the similarity across countries in how religion negatively influences children's altruism, challenging the view that religiosity facilitates prosocial behavior.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 1,357 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 368 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 14 4%
Germany 9 2%
United States 8 2%
France 4 1%
Canada 3 <1%
Switzerland 3 <1%
Chile 2 <1%
Mexico 2 <1%
Brazil 2 <1%
Other 14 4%
Unknown 307 83%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 94 26%
Researcher 88 24%
Student > Master 43 12%
Student > Bachelor 31 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 23 6%
Other 89 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 121 33%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 94 26%
Social Sciences 31 8%
Neuroscience 17 5%
Medicine and Dentistry 17 5%
Other 88 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1995. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 June 2017.
All research outputs
#278
of 7,931,175 outputs
Outputs from Current Biology
#6
of 6,769 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#11
of 243,211 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Current Biology
#1
of 137 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,931,175 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,769 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 34.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 243,211 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 137 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.