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Cluster failure: Why fMRI inferences for spatial extent have inflated false-positive rates

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, June 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Citations

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1450 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
2757 Mendeley
citeulike
17 CiteULike
Title
Cluster failure: Why fMRI inferences for spatial extent have inflated false-positive rates
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, June 2016
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1602413113
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anders Eklund, Thomas E. Nichols, Hans Knutsson

Abstract

The most widely used task functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) analyses use parametric statistical methods that depend on a variety of assumptions. In this work, we use real resting-state data and a total of 3 million random task group analyses to compute empirical familywise error rates for the fMRI software packages SPM, FSL, and AFNI, as well as a nonparametric permutation method. For a nominal familywise error rate of 5%, the parametric statistical methods are shown to be conservative for voxelwise inference and invalid for clusterwise inference. Our results suggest that the principal cause of the invalid cluster inferences is spatial autocorrelation functions that do not follow the assumed Gaussian shape. By comparison, the nonparametric permutation test is found to produce nominal results for voxelwise as well as clusterwise inference. These findings speak to the need of validating the statistical methods being used in the field of neuroimaging.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 1,488 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 2,757 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 50 2%
Germany 24 <1%
United Kingdom 23 <1%
Spain 10 <1%
Canada 10 <1%
Netherlands 9 <1%
Italy 9 <1%
Japan 9 <1%
Brazil 8 <1%
Other 68 2%
Unknown 2537 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 795 29%
Researcher 553 20%
Student > Master 333 12%
Student > Bachelor 200 7%
Unspecified 189 7%
Other 686 25%
Unknown 1 <1%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 762 28%
Neuroscience 516 19%
Unspecified 439 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 267 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 236 9%
Other 536 19%
Unknown 1 <1%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1771. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 July 2019.
All research outputs
#1,137
of 13,897,601 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#55
of 81,235 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#25
of 284,394 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#3
of 926 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,897,601 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 81,235 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 24.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 284,394 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 926 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.