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Effects of in vitro endochondral priming and pre-vascularisation of human MSC cellular aggregates in vivo

Overview of attention for article published in Stem Cell Research & Therapy, November 2015
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (82nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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9 tweeters

Citations

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27 Dimensions

Readers on

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48 Mendeley
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Title
Effects of in vitro endochondral priming and pre-vascularisation of human MSC cellular aggregates in vivo
Published in
Stem Cell Research & Therapy, November 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13287-015-0210-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Fiona E. Freeman, Ashley B. Allen, Hazel Y. Stevens, Robert E. Guldberg, Laoise M. McNamara

Abstract

During endochondral ossification, both the production of a cartilage template and the subsequent vascularisation of that template are essential precursors to bone tissue formation. Recent studies have found the application of both chondrogenic and vascular priming of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) enhanced the mineralisation potential of MSCs in vitro whilst also allowing for immature vessel formation. However, the in vivo viability, vascularisation and mineralisation potential of MSC aggregates that have been pre-conditioned in vitro by a combination of chondrogenic and vascular priming, has yet to be established. In this study, we test the hypothesis that a tissue regeneration approach that incorporates both chondrogenic priming of MSCs, to first form a cartilage template, and subsequent pre-vascularisation of the cartilage constructs, by co-culture with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in vitro, will improve vessel infiltration and thus mineral formation once implanted in vivo. Human MSCs were chondrogenically primed for 21 days, after which they were co-cultured with MSCs and HUVECs and cultured in endothelial growth medium for another 21 days. These aggregates were then implanted subcutaneously in nude rats for 4 weeks. We used a combination of bioluminescent imaging, microcomputed tomography, histology (Masson's trichrome and Alizarin Red) and immunohistochemistry (CD31, CD146, and α-smooth actin) to assess the vascularisation and mineralisation potential of these MSC aggregates in vivo. Pre-vascularised cartilaginous aggregates were found to have mature endogenous vessels (indicated by α-smooth muscle actin walls and erythrocytes) after 4 weeks subcutaneous implantation, and also viable human MSCs (detected by bioluminescent imaging) 21 days after subcutaneous implantation. In contrast, aggregates that were not pre-vascularised had no vessels within the aggregate interior and human MSCs did not remain viable beyond 14 days. Interestingly, the pre-vascularised cartilaginous aggregates were also the only group to have mineralised nodules within the cellular aggregates, whereas mineralisation occurred in the alginate surrounding the aggregates for all other groups. Taken together these results indicate that a combined chondrogenic priming and pre-vascularisation approach for in vitro culture of MSC aggregates shows enhanced vessel formation and increased mineralisation within the cellular aggregate when implanted subcutaneously in vivo.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 48 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Unknown 46 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 27%
Researcher 5 10%
Student > Bachelor 5 10%
Student > Master 5 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 6%
Other 5 10%
Unknown 12 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 21%
Engineering 9 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 10%
Materials Science 3 6%
Chemistry 2 4%
Other 3 6%
Unknown 16 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 January 2016.
All research outputs
#992,127
of 6,908,690 outputs
Outputs from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#132
of 531 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#45,627
of 238,556 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#10
of 57 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,908,690 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 531 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 238,556 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 57 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.