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Genome-wide identification and characterization of auxin response factor (ARF) family genes related to flower and fruit development in papaya (Carica papaya L.)

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, November 2015
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Title
Genome-wide identification and characterization of auxin response factor (ARF) family genes related to flower and fruit development in papaya (Carica papaya L.)
Published in
BMC Genomics, November 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12864-015-2182-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kaidong Liu, Changchun Yuan, Haili Li, Wanhuang Lin, Yanjun Yang, Chenjia Shen, Xiaolin Zheng

Abstract

Auxin and auxin signaling are involved in a series of developmental processes in plants. Auxin Response Factors (ARFs) is reported to modulate the expression of target genes by binding to auxin response elements (AuxREs) and influence the transcriptional activation of down-stream target genes. However, how ARF genes function in flower development and fruit ripening of papaya (Carica papaya L.) is largely unknown. In this study, a comprehensive characterization and expression profiling analysis of 11 C. papaya ARF (CpARF) genes was performed using the newly updated papaya reference genome data. We analyzed CpARF expression patterns at different developmental stages. CpARF1, CpARF2, CpARF4, CpARF5, and CpARF10 showed the highest expression at the initial stage of flower development, but decreased during the following developmental stages. CpARF6 expression increased during the developmental process and reached its peak level at the final stage of flower development. The expression of CpARF1 increased significantly during the fruit ripening stages. Many AuxREs were included in the promoters of two ethylene signaling genes (CpETR1 and CpETR2) and three ethylene-synthesis-related genes (CpACS1, CpACS2, and CpACO1), suggesting that CpARFs might be involved in fruit ripening via the regulation of ethylene signaling. Our study provided comprehensive information on ARF family in papaya, including gene structures, chromosome locations, phylogenetic relationships, and expression patterns. The involvement of CpARF gene expression changes in flower and fruit development allowed us to understand the role of ARF-mediated auxin signaling in the maturation of reproductive organs in papaya.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Chile 1 3%
Unknown 37 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 18%
Researcher 6 16%
Student > Master 6 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 8%
Professor 2 5%
Other 5 13%
Unknown 9 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 21 55%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 21%
Unspecified 1 3%
Unknown 8 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 November 2015.
All research outputs
#4,833,451
of 6,535,344 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#4,108
of 5,136 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#144,172
of 210,012 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#352
of 397 outputs
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