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A systematic survey of the integration of animal behavior into conservation

Overview of attention for article published in Conservation Biology, February 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (55th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
27 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages

Citations

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67 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
309 Mendeley
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Title
A systematic survey of the integration of animal behavior into conservation
Published in
Conservation Biology, February 2016
DOI 10.1111/cobi.12654
Pubmed ID
Authors

Oded Berger‐Tal, Daniel T. Blumstein, Scott Carroll, Robert N. Fisher, Sarah L. Mesnick, Megan A. Owen, David Saltz, Colleen Cassady Claire, Ronald R. Swaisgood

Abstract

The role of behavioral ecology in improving wildlife conservation and management has been the subject of much recent debate. We aim to answer two foundational questions about the current use of behavioral knowledge in conservation: 1. To what extent is behavioral knowledge used in wildlife conservation and management? 2. How does the use of behavior differ among conservation fields in both frequency and types of use? To answer these questions, we searched the literature for intersections between key fields of animal behavior and conservation biology and created a systematic 'heat' map to visualize relative efforts. Our analysis challenges previous suggestions that there is little association between the fields of behavioral ecology and conservation and reveals tremendous variation in the use of different behaviors in conservation. For instance, some behaviors, such as foraging and dispersal, are commonly considered, but other behaviors such as learning, social or anti-predatory behaviors are hardly considered. Our analysis suggests that in many cases awareness of the importance of behavior does not translate into applicable management tools. We recommend that researchers should focus on developing research in underutilized intersections of behavior and conservation themes for which preliminary work show a potential for improving conservation and management, on translating behavioral theory into applicable and testable predictions, and on creating systematic reviews to summarize the behavioral evidence within the behavior-conservation intersections for which many studies exist. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 27 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 309 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 <1%
France 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 303 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 63 20%
Researcher 51 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 50 16%
Student > Bachelor 38 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 14 5%
Other 51 17%
Unknown 42 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 158 51%
Environmental Science 64 21%
Psychology 6 2%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 2%
Social Sciences 3 <1%
Other 18 6%
Unknown 55 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 16. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 August 2016.
All research outputs
#1,700,012
of 20,260,850 outputs
Outputs from Conservation Biology
#1,065
of 3,548 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#31,709
of 299,477 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Conservation Biology
#22
of 47 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,260,850 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,548 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 299,477 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 47 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.