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Tremendous Human, Social, and Economic Losses Caused by Obstinate Application of the Failed Linear No-threshold Model

Overview of attention for article published in Yakugaku Zasshi = Journal of Pharmaceutical Society of Japan, November 2015
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  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

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9 tweeters

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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6 Mendeley
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Title
Tremendous Human, Social, and Economic Losses Caused by Obstinate Application of the Failed Linear No-threshold Model
Published in
Yakugaku Zasshi = Journal of Pharmaceutical Society of Japan, November 2015
DOI 10.1248/yakushi.15-00188
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shizuyo Sutou

Abstract

  The linear no-threshold model (LNT) was recommended in 1956, with abandonment of the traditional threshold dose-response for genetic risk assessment. Adoption of LNT by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) became the standard for radiation regulation worldwide. The ICRP recommends a dose limit of 1 mSv/year for the public, which is too low and which terrorizes innocent people. Indeed, LNT arose mainly from the lifespan survivor study (LSS) of atomic bomb survivors. The LSS, which asserts linear dose-response and no threshold, is challenged mainly on three points. 1) Radiation doses were underestimated by half because of disregard for major residual radiation, resulting in cancer risk overestimation. 2) The dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor (DDREF) of 2 is used, but the actual DDREF is estimated as 16, resulting in cancer risk overestimation by several times. 3) Adaptive response (hormesis) is observed in leukemia and solid cancer cases, consistently contradicting the linearity of LNT. Drastic reduction of cancer risk moves the dose-response curve close to the control line, allowing the setting of a threshold. Living organisms have been evolving for 3.8 billion years under radiation exposure, naturally acquiring various defense mechanisms such as DNA repair mechanisms, apoptosis, and immune response. The failure of LNT lies in the neglect of carcinogenesis and these biological mechanisms. Obstinate application of LNT continues to cause tremendous human, social, and economic losses. The 60-year-old LNT must be rejected to establish a new scientific knowledge-based system.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 6 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 6 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 2 33%
Student > Postgraduate 1 17%
Researcher 1 17%
Unknown 2 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 1 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 17%
Physics and Astronomy 1 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 17%
Unknown 2 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 November 2016.
All research outputs
#3,638,579
of 14,389,463 outputs
Outputs from Yakugaku Zasshi = Journal of Pharmaceutical Society of Japan
#218
of 1,495 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#70,454
of 284,180 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Yakugaku Zasshi = Journal of Pharmaceutical Society of Japan
#1
of 19 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,389,463 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,495 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 284,180 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 19 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.