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An insecticide-treated bed-net campaign and childhood malaria in Burkina Faso

Overview of attention for article published in Bulletin of the World Health Organization, August 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (67th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (51st percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 policy source
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

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28 Dimensions

Readers on

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90 Mendeley
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Title
An insecticide-treated bed-net campaign and childhood malaria in Burkina Faso
Published in
Bulletin of the World Health Organization, August 2015
DOI 10.2471/blt.14.147702
Pubmed ID
Authors

Valérie R Louis, Anja Schoeps, Justin Tiendrebéogo, Claudia Beiersmann, Maurice Yé, Marie R Damiba, Guang Y Lu, André H Mbayiha, Manuela De Allegri, Albrecht Jahn, Ali Sié, Heiko Becher, Olaf Müller

Abstract

To investigate if the first national insecticide-treated bed-net campaign in Burkina Faso, done in 2010, was followed by a decrease in childhood malaria in a district with high baseline transmission of the disease. We obtained data on the prevalence of Plasmodium falciparum parasitaemia in children aged 2 weeks to 36 months from malaria surveys in 2009 and 2011. We assessed morbidity in children younger than 5 years by comparing data from the Nouna health district's health management information system before and after the campaign in 2010. We analysed mortality data from 2008 to 2012 from Nouna's health and demographic surveillance system. The bed-net campaign was associated with an increase in the reported use of insecticide-treated nets. In 2009, 73% (630/869) of children reportedly slept under nets. In 2011, 92% (449/487) did. The campaign had no effect on the proportion of young children with P. falciparum parasitaemia after the rainy season; 52% (442/858) in 2009 and 53% (263/499) in 2011. Cases of malaria increased markedly after the campaign, as did the number of children presenting with other diseases. The campaign was not associated with any changes in child mortality. The 2010 insecticide-treated net campaign in Burkina Faso was not associated with a decrease in care-seeking for malaria or all-cause mortality in children younger than 5 years. The most likely explanation is the high coverage of nets in the study area before the campaign which could have had an effect on mosquito vectors, limiting the campaign's impact.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 90 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 1%
Malawi 1 1%
Unknown 88 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 26 29%
Researcher 17 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 13%
Student > Bachelor 10 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 8%
Other 9 10%
Unknown 9 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 24 27%
Social Sciences 14 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 3%
Other 15 17%
Unknown 13 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 November 2015.
All research outputs
#5,419,720
of 17,359,532 outputs
Outputs from Bulletin of the World Health Organization
#1,798
of 3,940 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#90,997
of 290,170 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Bulletin of the World Health Organization
#21
of 49 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,359,532 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 68th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,940 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 290,170 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 49 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.