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Molecular mechanisms of inflammation and tissue injury after major trauma-is complement the "bad guy"?

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Biomedical Science, November 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#14 of 264)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

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8 tweeters

Readers on

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104 Mendeley
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Title
Molecular mechanisms of inflammation and tissue injury after major trauma-is complement the "bad guy"?
Published in
Journal of Biomedical Science, November 2011
DOI 10.1186/1423-0127-18-90
Pubmed ID
Authors

Miriam D Neher, Miriam D Neher, Sebastian Weckbach, Michael A Flierl, Markus S Huber-Lang, Philip F Stahel

Abstract

Trauma represents the leading cause of death among young people in industrialized countries. Recent clinical and experimental studies have brought increasing evidence for activation of the innate immune system in contributing to the pathogenesis of trauma-induced sequelae and adverse outcome. As the "first line of defense", the complement system represents a potent effector arm of innate immunity, and has been implicated in mediating the early posttraumatic inflammatory response. Despite its generic beneficial functions, including pathogen elimination and immediate response to danger signals, complement activation may exert detrimental effects after trauma, in terms of mounting an "innocent bystander" attack on host tissue. Posttraumatic ischemia/reperfusion injuries represent the classic entity of complement-mediated tissue damage, adding to the "antigenic load" by exacerbation of local and systemic inflammation and release of toxic mediators. These pathophysiological sequelae have been shown to sustain the systemic inflammatory response syndrome after major trauma, and can ultimately contribute to remote organ injury and death. Numerous experimental models have been designed in recent years with the aim of mimicking the inflammatory reaction after trauma and to allow the testing of new pharmacological approaches, including the emergent concept of site-targeted complement inhibition. The present review provides an overview on the current understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of complement activation after major trauma, with an emphasis of emerging therapeutic concepts which may provide the rationale for a "bench-to-bedside" approach in the design of future pharmacological strategies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 104 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 3%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 98 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 18 17%
Student > Master 16 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 12 12%
Student > Bachelor 11 11%
Other 23 22%
Unknown 9 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 46 44%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 24 23%
Immunology and Microbiology 9 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 4%
Engineering 3 3%
Other 8 8%
Unknown 10 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 November 2011.
All research outputs
#637,460
of 4,702,424 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Biomedical Science
#14
of 264 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#29,740
of 231,086 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Biomedical Science
#3
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,702,424 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 264 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 231,086 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.