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Sex-biased severity of sarcoptic mange at the same biological cost in a sexually dimorphic ungulate

Overview of attention for article published in Parasites & Vectors, November 2015
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4 tweeters

Citations

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10 Dimensions

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31 Mendeley
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Title
Sex-biased severity of sarcoptic mange at the same biological cost in a sexually dimorphic ungulate
Published in
Parasites & Vectors, November 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13071-015-1186-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jorge R. López-Olvera, Emmanuel Serrano, Anna Armenteros, Jesús M. Pérez, Paulino Fandos, João Carvalho, Roser Velarde, Francisco J. Cano-Manuel, Arián Ráez, José Espinosa, Ramón C. Soriguer, José E. Granados

Abstract

In sexually dimorphic species, male susceptibility to parasite infection and mortality is frequently higher than in females. The Iberian ibex (Capra pyrenaica) is a sexually dimorphic mountain ungulate endemic to the Iberian Peninsula commonly affected by sarcoptic mange, a chronic catabolic skin disease caused by Sarcoptes scabiei. Since 1992, sarcoptic mange affects the Iberian ibex population of the Sierra Nevada Natural Space (SNNS). This study aims at exploring whether mange severity, in terms of prevalence and its effects on body condition, is male-biased in Iberian ibex. One thousand and seventy-one adult Iberian ibexes (439 females and 632 males) were randomly shot-harvested in the SNNS from May 1995 to February 2008. Sarcoptic mange stage was classified as healthy, mildly infected or severely infected. Sex-biased prevalence of severe mange was evaluated by a Chi-square test whereas the interaction between mange severity and sex on body condition was assessed by additive models. Among scabietic individuals, the prevalence of severely affected males was 1.29 times higher than in females. On the other hand, both sexes were not able to take profit of a higher availability of seasonal food resources when sarcoptic, particularly in the severe stages. Sarcoptic mange severity is male-biased in Iberian ibex, though not mange effects on body condition. Behavioural, immunological and physiological characteristics of males may contribute to this partial sex-biased susceptibility to sarcoptic mange.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 1 3%
Unknown 30 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 29%
Researcher 4 13%
Student > Bachelor 4 13%
Student > Master 4 13%
Other 2 6%
Other 6 19%
Unknown 2 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 10 32%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 29%
Environmental Science 6 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 6%
Psychology 1 3%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 3 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 July 2016.
All research outputs
#4,029,166
of 8,082,038 outputs
Outputs from Parasites & Vectors
#1,126
of 2,247 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#115,856
of 243,571 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasites & Vectors
#102
of 180 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,082,038 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,247 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.7. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 243,571 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 180 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.