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Comutations in DNA Damage Response Pathways Serve as Potential Biomarkers for Immune Checkpoint Blockade

Overview of attention for article published in Cancer Research, November 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (81st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

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115 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
81 Mendeley
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Title
Comutations in DNA Damage Response Pathways Serve as Potential Biomarkers for Immune Checkpoint Blockade
Published in
Cancer Research, November 2018
DOI 10.1158/0008-5472.can-18-1814
Pubmed ID
Authors

Zhijie Wang, Jing Zhao, Guoqiang Wang, Fan Zhang, Zemin Zhang, Fan Zhang, Yuzi Zhang, Hua Dong, Xiaochen Zhao, Jianchun Duan, Hua Bai, Yanhua Tian, Rui Wan, Miao Han, Yan Cao, Lei Xiong, Li Liu, Shuhang Wang, Shangli Cai, Tony S.K. Mok, Jie Wang

Abstract

Biomarkers such as programmed death receptor 1 ligand (PD-L1) expression, tumor mutational burden (TMB), and high microsatellite instability are potentially applicable to predict the efficacy of immune checkpoint blockade (ICB). However, several challenges such as defining the cut-off value, test platform uniformity, and low frequencies limit their broad clinical application. Here we identify co-mutations in the DNA damage response (DDR) pathways of homologous recombination repair and mismatch repair (HRR-MMR) or HRR and base excision repair (HRR-BER) (defined as co-mut+) that are associated with increased TMB and neoantigen load and increased levels of immune gene expression signatures. In four public clinical cohorts, co-mut+ patients presented a higher objective response rate and a longer progression-free survival or overall survival than co-mut- patients. Overall, identification of DDR co-mutations in HRR-MMR or HRR-BER as predictors of response to ICB provides a potentially convenient approach for future clinical practice.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 81 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 81 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 22 27%
Student > Bachelor 11 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 9%
Student > Master 6 7%
Student > Postgraduate 4 5%
Other 12 15%
Unknown 19 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 27 33%
Medicine and Dentistry 15 19%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 6%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 2%
Engineering 2 2%
Other 4 5%
Unknown 26 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 May 2022.
All research outputs
#2,599,153
of 21,399,109 outputs
Outputs from Cancer Research
#2,156
of 17,175 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#53,660
of 295,967 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cancer Research
#31
of 203 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,399,109 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 17,175 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 295,967 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 203 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.