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Severe/uncontrolled asthma and overall survival in atopic patients with eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis

Overview of attention for article published in Respiratory Medicine, September 2018
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Title
Severe/uncontrolled asthma and overall survival in atopic patients with eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis
Published in
Respiratory Medicine, September 2018
DOI 10.1016/j.rmed.2018.07.017
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alvise Berti, Gerald W. Volcheck, Divi Cornec, Robert J. Smyth, Ulrich Specks, Karina A. Keogh

Abstract

Although asthma, rhinitis/rhinosinusitis and peripheral eosinophilia are present in virtually all patients with eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA), the role of atopy in these patients is not well defined. To clarify the role of atopy in patients affected with EGPA. Clinical, laboratory and standard spirometry data have been abstracted from medical records. Only patients who underwent skin and/or specific IgE testing for common aeroallergens before the vasculitic phase were included. Overall, 33.5% (63) of our patients underwent skin and/or specific IgE testing to aeroallergens. Atopy related to aeroallergens was confirmed in 22.3% (two-third of those tested), and was associated with more severe/uncontrolled asthma (p < 0.001), including a greater use of oral glucocorticoids for respiratory manifestations the year before the diagnosis of EGPA (p = 0.013). Atopic patients with EGPA had higher total serum IgE levels and less renal disease at EGPA diagnosis compared to non-atopic patients (p < 0.05). Among atopic patients, the majority had multiple sensitizations (76%); dust mite and grass pollen were the most common respiratory allergens identified. The number of allergens did not correlate with peripheral eosinophilia, total serum IgE, ESR, or measures of airway obstruction (p > 0.05 in all cases). The presence of atopy increased the risk of severe/uncontrolled asthma, but not the risk of severe vasculitis (Five Factor Score≥1). Atopic patients had a better overall survival (p = 0.027). In EGPA, atopy is associated with better prognosis and more severe/uncontrolled asthma manifestations in the year before the development of vasculitis, but not with more severe vasculitis at presentation.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 9 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 9 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 3 33%
Researcher 2 22%
Other 1 11%
Student > Bachelor 1 11%
Librarian 1 11%
Other 1 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 4 44%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 22%
Engineering 2 22%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 September 2018.
All research outputs
#11,200,397
of 12,585,503 outputs
Outputs from Respiratory Medicine
#1,775
of 1,997 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#231,402
of 269,374 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Respiratory Medicine
#32
of 41 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,585,503 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 41 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.