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Origin and dynamics of vortex rings in drop splashing

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Communications, September 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (53rd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
1 tweeter
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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34 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
75 Mendeley
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Title
Origin and dynamics of vortex rings in drop splashing
Published in
Nature Communications, September 2015
DOI 10.1038/ncomms9187
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ji San Lee, Su Ji Park, Jun Ho Lee, Byung Mook Weon, Kamel Fezzaa, Jung Ho Je

Abstract

A vortex is a flow phenomenon that is very commonly observed in nature. More than a century, a vortex ring that forms during drop splashing has caught the attention of many scientists due to its importance in understanding fluid mixing and mass transport processes. However, the origin of the vortices and their dynamics remain unclear, mostly due to the lack of appropriate visualization methods. Here, with ultrafast X-ray phase-contrast imaging, we show that the formation of vortex rings originates from the energy transfer by capillary waves generated at the moment of the drop impact. Interestingly, we find a row of vortex rings along the drop wall, as demonstrated by a phase diagram established here, with different power-law dependencies of the angular velocities on the Reynolds number. These results provide important insight that allows understanding and modelling any type of vortex rings in nature, beyond just vortex rings during drop splashing.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 75 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
China 1 1%
Unknown 74 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 27 36%
Student > Master 17 23%
Researcher 7 9%
Student > Postgraduate 5 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 7%
Other 9 12%
Unknown 5 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 32 43%
Physics and Astronomy 15 20%
Materials Science 8 11%
Chemical Engineering 5 7%
Energy 3 4%
Other 2 3%
Unknown 10 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 May 2017.
All research outputs
#1,213,424
of 12,918,691 outputs
Outputs from Nature Communications
#11,333
of 22,180 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#34,146
of 277,849 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Communications
#927
of 2,016 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,918,691 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 22,180 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 47.1. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 277,849 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2,016 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.