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Association Between Physician Burnout and Patient Safety, Professionalism, and Patient Satisfaction

Overview of attention for article published in JAMA Internal Medicine, October 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#36 of 4,612)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Citations

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458 Dimensions

Readers on

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739 Mendeley
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Title
Association Between Physician Burnout and Patient Safety, Professionalism, and Patient Satisfaction
Published in
JAMA Internal Medicine, October 2018
DOI 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.3713
Pubmed ID
Authors

Maria Panagioti, Keith Geraghty, Judith Johnson, Anli Zhou, Efharis Panagopoulou, Carolyn Chew-Graham, David Peters, Alexander Hodkinson, Ruth Riley, Aneez Esmail

Abstract

Physician burnout has taken the form of an epidemic that may affect core domains of health care delivery, including patient safety, quality of care, and patient satisfaction. However, this evidence has not been systematically quantified. To examine whether physician burnout is associated with an increased risk of patient safety incidents, suboptimal care outcomes due to low professionalism, and lower patient satisfaction. MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycInfo, and CINAHL databases were searched until October 22, 2017, using combinations of the key terms physicians, burnout, and patient care. Detailed standardized searches with no language restriction were undertaken. The reference lists of eligible studies and other relevant systematic reviews were hand-searched. Quantitative observational studies. Two independent reviewers were involved. The main meta-analysis was followed by subgroup and sensitivity analyses. All analyses were performed using random-effects models. Formal tests for heterogeneity (I2) and publication bias were performed. The core outcomes were the quantitative associations between burnout and patient safety, professionalism, and patient satisfaction reported as odds ratios (ORs) with their 95% CIs. Of the 5234 records identified, 47 studies on 42 473 physicians (25 059 [59.0%] men; median age, 38 years [range, 27-53 years]) were included in the meta-analysis. Physician burnout was associated with an increased risk of patient safety incidents (OR, 1.96; 95% CI, 1.59-2.40), poorer quality of care due to low professionalism (OR, 2.31; 95% CI, 1.87-2.85), and reduced patient satisfaction (OR, 2.28; 95% CI, 1.42-3.68). The heterogeneity was high and the study quality was low to moderate. The links between burnout and low professionalism were larger in residents and early-career (≤5 years post residency) physicians compared with middle- and late-career physicians (Cohen Q = 7.27; P = .003). The reporting method of patient safety incidents and professionalism (physician-reported vs system-recorded) significantly influenced the main results (Cohen Q = 8.14; P = .007). This meta-analysis provides evidence that physician burnout may jeopardize patient care; reversal of this risk has to be viewed as a fundamental health care policy goal across the globe. Health care organizations are encouraged to invest in efforts to improve physician wellness, particularly for early-career physicians. The methods of recording patient care quality and safety outcomes require improvements to concisely capture the outcome of burnout on the performance of health care organizations.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 739 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 739 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 93 13%
Researcher 88 12%
Student > Bachelor 72 10%
Other 64 9%
Student > Postgraduate 56 8%
Other 218 29%
Unknown 148 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 290 39%
Nursing and Health Professions 72 10%
Psychology 58 8%
Social Sciences 18 2%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 12 2%
Other 81 11%
Unknown 208 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2018. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 September 2021.
All research outputs
#2,659
of 18,925,350 outputs
Outputs from JAMA Internal Medicine
#36
of 4,612 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#67
of 286,803 outputs
Outputs of similar age from JAMA Internal Medicine
#3
of 126 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,925,350 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,612 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 147.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 286,803 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 126 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.