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Wearing American Football helmets increases cervicocephalic kinaesthetic awareness in “elite” American Football players but not controls

Overview of attention for article published in Chiropractic & Manual Therapies, November 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

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7 tweeters

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22 Mendeley
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Title
Wearing American Football helmets increases cervicocephalic kinaesthetic awareness in “elite” American Football players but not controls
Published in
Chiropractic & Manual Therapies, November 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12998-015-0077-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Peter W. McCarthy, Phillip J. Hume, Andrew I. Heusch, Sally D. Lark

Abstract

While there have been investigations into the reduced neck injury rate of wearing protective helmets, there is little information on its effects on normal kinaesthetic neck function. This study aims to quantify the kinaesthetic and movement effects of the American football helmet. Fifteen British Collegiate American football players (mean age 22.2, SD 1.9; BMI kg.m(2) 26.3, SD 3.7) were age and size matched to 11 non-American football playing university students (mean age 22.5, SD 3.6; BMI 24.3, SD 3.3 kg.m(2)). Both groups had their active cervical range of motion and head repositioning accuracy measured during neck flexion/extension using a modified cervical range of motion device and a similarly modified football helmet. Wearing helmets significantly reduced active cervical range of motion in extension in both groups (P = 0.007 and P = 0.001 Controls and American Footballers respectively). While both groups had similar repositioning when not wearing a helmet (flexion P = 0.99; extension P = 0.52), when wearing helmets, American football players appeared to be more accurate in relation to cervical kinaesthetic repositioning (ANOVA: P = 0.077: flexion effect size =0.84; extension effect size =0.38). Wearing American football helmets significantly reduces the active cervical range of motion in extension, along with a change in the neutral head position. American footballers have a greater accuracy in repositioning their head from flexion (potentially enhanced proprioception) when wearing a helmet. This finding might allow development of a simple objective test to help discern presence of minor concussive or cervical musculoskeletal injury on or off the field.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 22 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 27%
Unspecified 5 23%
Student > Bachelor 3 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 9%
Other 4 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 6 27%
Unspecified 5 23%
Sports and Recreations 5 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 18%
Decision Sciences 1 5%
Other 1 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 December 2015.
All research outputs
#1,518,267
of 7,398,210 outputs
Outputs from Chiropractic & Manual Therapies
#123
of 250 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#55,441
of 222,121 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Chiropractic & Manual Therapies
#3
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,398,210 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 78th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 250 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.8. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 222,121 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.