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Top predators as biodiversity regulators: the dingo Canis lupus dingo as a case study

Overview of attention for article published in Biological Reviews, November 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#16 of 870)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
9 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
7 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
140 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
327 Mendeley
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Title
Top predators as biodiversity regulators: the dingo Canis lupus dingo as a case study
Published in
Biological Reviews, November 2011
DOI 10.1111/j.1469-185x.2011.00203.x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Letnic, Mike, Ritchie, Euan G., Dickman, Christopher R., Letnic M, Ritchie EG, Dickman CR, Mike Letnic, Euan G. Ritchie, Christopher R. Dickman

Abstract

Top-order predators often have positive effects on biological diversity owing to their key functional roles in regulating trophic cascades and other ecological processes. Their loss has been identified as a major factor contributing to the decline of biodiversity in both aquatic and terrestrial systems. Consequently, restoring and maintaining the ecological function of top predators is a critical global imperative. Here we review studies of the ecological effects of the dingo Canis lupus dingo, Australia's largest land predator, using this as a case study to explore the influence of a top predator on biodiversity at a continental scale. The dingo was introduced to Australia by people at least 3500 years ago and has an ambiguous status owing to its brief history on the continent, its adverse impacts on livestock production and its role as an ecosystem architect. A large body of research now indicates that dingoes regulate ecological cascades, particularly in arid Australia, and that the removal of dingoes results in an increase in the abundances and impacts of herbivores and invasive mesopredators, most notably the red fox Vulpes vulpes. The loss of dingoes has been linked to widespread losses of small and medium-sized native mammals, the depletion of plant biomass due to the effects of irrupting herbivore populations and increased predation rates by red foxes. We outline a suite of conceptual models to describe the effects of dingoes on vertebrate populations across different Australian environments. Finally, we discuss key issues that require consideration or warrant research before the ecological effects of dingoes can be incorporated formally into biodiversity conservation programs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 327 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 10 3%
Brazil 5 2%
United States 3 <1%
Peru 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
China 1 <1%
Other 10 3%
Unknown 293 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 69 21%
Researcher 60 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 59 18%
Student > Bachelor 44 13%
Other 26 8%
Other 69 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 189 58%
Environmental Science 91 28%
Unspecified 22 7%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 8 2%
Social Sciences 6 2%
Other 11 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 100. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 August 2018.
All research outputs
#122,525
of 11,727,438 outputs
Outputs from Biological Reviews
#16
of 870 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,682
of 256,513 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biological Reviews
#2
of 38 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,727,438 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 870 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 256,513 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 38 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.