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How Could Commercial Terms of Use and Privacy Policies Undermine Informed Consent in the Age of Mobile Health?

Overview of attention for article published in AMA Journal of Ethics, September 2018
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29 tweeters

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17 Mendeley
Title
How Could Commercial Terms of Use and Privacy Policies Undermine Informed Consent in the Age of Mobile Health?
Published in
AMA Journal of Ethics, September 2018
DOI 10.1001/amajethics.2018.864
Pubmed ID
Abstract

Granular personal data generated by mobile health (mHealth) technologies coupled with the complexity of mHealth systems creates risks to privacy that are difficult to foresee, understand, and communicate, especially for purposes of informed consent. Moreover, commercial terms of use, to which users are almost always required to agree, depart significantly from standards of informed consent. As data use scandals increasingly surface in the news, the field of mHealth must advocate for user-centered privacy and informed consent practices that motivate patients' and research participants' trust. We review the challenges and relevance of informed consent and discuss opportunities for creating new standards for user-centered informed consent processes in the age of mHealth.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 29 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 17 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 17 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 8 47%
Unspecified 3 18%
Researcher 2 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 6%
Professor 1 6%
Other 2 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Computer Science 8 47%
Unspecified 3 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 18%
Social Sciences 2 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 6%
Other 0 0%