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Accelerated ex situ breeding of GBSS- and PTST1-edited cassava for modified starch

Overview of attention for article published in Science Advances, September 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (83rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
13 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
127 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
1 Google+ user
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
32 Mendeley
Title
Accelerated ex situ breeding of GBSS- and PTST1-edited cassava for modified starch
Published in
Science Advances, September 2018
DOI 10.1126/sciadv.aat6086
Pubmed ID
Authors

Simon E. Bull, David Seung, Christelle Chanez, Devang Mehta, Joel-Elias Kuon, Elisabeth Truernit, Anton Hochmuth, Irene Zurkirchen, Samuel C. Zeeman, Wilhelm Gruissem, Hervé Vanderschuren

Abstract

Crop diversification required to meet demands for food security and industrial use is often challenged by breeding time and amenability of varieties to genome modification. Cassava is one such crop. Grown for its large starch-rich storage roots, it serves as a staple food and a commodity in the multibillion-dollar starch industry. Starch is composed of the glucose polymers amylopectin and amylose, with the latter strongly influencing the physicochemical properties of starch during cooking and processing. We demonstrate that CRISPR-Cas9 (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9)-mediated targeted mutagenesis of two genes involved in amylose biosynthesis, PROTEIN TARGETING TO STARCH (PTST1) or GRANULE BOUND STARCH SYNTHASE (GBSS), can reduce or eliminate amylose content in root starch. Integration of the Arabidopsis FLOWERING LOCUS T gene in the genome-editing cassette allowed us to accelerate flowering-an event seldom seen under glasshouse conditions. Germinated seeds yielded S1, a transgene-free progeny that inherited edited genes. This attractive new plant breeding technique for modified cassava could be extended to other crops to provide a suite of novel varieties with useful traits for food and industrial applications.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 127 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 32 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 28%
Researcher 6 19%
Other 4 13%
Student > Bachelor 4 13%
Unspecified 2 6%
Other 7 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 17 53%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 22%
Unspecified 4 13%
Chemistry 1 3%
Neuroscience 1 3%
Other 2 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 199. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 November 2018.
All research outputs
#60,426
of 12,779,047 outputs
Outputs from Science Advances
#420
of 2,718 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,737
of 269,103 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science Advances
#40
of 241 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,779,047 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,718 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 127.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,103 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 241 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.