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Climate-driven environmental changes around 8,200 years ago favoured increases in cetacean strandings and Mediterranean hunter-gatherers exploited them

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, November 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
7 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
22 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
63 Mendeley
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Title
Climate-driven environmental changes around 8,200 years ago favoured increases in cetacean strandings and Mediterranean hunter-gatherers exploited them
Published in
Scientific Reports, November 2015
DOI 10.1038/srep16288
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marcello A. Mannino, Sahra Talamo, Antonio Tagliacozzo, Ivana Fiore, Olaf Nehlich, Marcello Piperno, Sebastiano Tusa, Carmine Collina, Rosaria Di Salvo, Vittoria Schimmenti, Michael P. Richards

Abstract

Cetacean mass strandings occur regularly worldwide, yet the compounded effects of natural and anthropogenic factors often complicate our understanding of these phenomena. Evidence of past stranding episodes may, thus, be essential to establish the potential influence of climate change. Investigations on bones from the site of Grotta dell'Uzzo in North West Sicily (Italy) show that the rapid climate change around 8,200 years ago coincided with increased strandings in the Mediterranean Sea. Stable isotope analyses on collagen from a large sample of remains recovered at this cave indicate that Mesolithic hunter-gatherers relied little on marine resources. A human and a red fox dating to the 8.2-kyr-BP climatic event, however, acquired at least one third of their protein from cetaceans. Numerous carcasses should have been available annually, for at least a decade, to obtain these proportions of meat. Our findings imply that climate-driven environmental changes, caused by global warming, may represent a serious threat to cetaceans in the near future.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 63 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 1 2%
Canada 1 2%
Unknown 61 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 16 25%
Student > Master 11 17%
Other 4 6%
Student > Bachelor 4 6%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 6%
Other 13 21%
Unknown 11 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 18 29%
Arts and Humanities 13 21%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 8 13%
Social Sciences 4 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 3%
Other 6 10%
Unknown 12 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 15. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 November 2020.
All research outputs
#1,442,528
of 16,505,296 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#12,964
of 88,026 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#36,256
of 364,527 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#509
of 3,539 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,505,296 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 88,026 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 364,527 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3,539 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.