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Multiple Renal and Splenic Lesions in Cat Scratch Disease

Overview of attention for article published in Japanese Journal of Infectious Diseases, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#27 of 481)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (75th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
7 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Readers on

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13 Mendeley
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Title
Multiple Renal and Splenic Lesions in Cat Scratch Disease
Published in
Japanese Journal of Infectious Diseases, January 2016
DOI 10.7883/yoken.jjid.2015.362
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hiroyuki Wakiguchi, Yasuhiro Okamoto, Manaka Matsunaga, Yuichi Kodama, Akinori Miyazono, Shunji Seki, Naohiro Ikeda, Yoshifumi Kawano

Abstract

Cat scratch disease (CSD) is an infectious disease caused by Bartonella henselae. Atypical clinical presentations of CSD include prolonged fever and multiple hepatosplenic lesions, although these are rare. Furthermore, multiple renal lesions are extremely rare in CSD. The patient was an 11-year-old Japanese girl who had a prolonged fever of unknown cause after being scratched and bitten by a kitten. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed multiple small, round hypodense lesions in both kidneys and in the spleen. Based on her history and the results of CT, a diagnosis of CSD was made; the diagnosis was confirmed with serological tests, which indicated antibodies against Bartonella henselae. After treatment with azithromycin, her fever immediately improved. Careful history taking and imaging are essential for the diagnosis of atypical CSD. In CT images, not only hepatosplenic lesions but also renal lesions are important features indicative of a diagnosis of atypical CSD. Subsequently, a diagnosis of CSD can be confirmed with specific serological tests. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported Japanese case of multiple renal and splenic lesions in a patient with CSD. Although atypical CSD is difficult to diagnose, an early diagnosis is important to prevent invasive examinations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 13 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 4 31%
Researcher 3 23%
Student > Bachelor 1 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Other 3 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 54%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 8%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 8%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 8%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 1 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 April 2020.
All research outputs
#4,010,285
of 15,418,159 outputs
Outputs from Japanese Journal of Infectious Diseases
#27
of 481 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#87,865
of 360,208 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Japanese Journal of Infectious Diseases
#4
of 43 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,418,159 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 481 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 360,208 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 43 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.