↓ Skip to main content

Dietary folate intake and pancreatic cancer risk: Results from the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Cancer, December 2018
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (51st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Readers on

mendeley
19 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Dietary folate intake and pancreatic cancer risk: Results from the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition
Published in
International Journal of Cancer, December 2018
DOI 10.1002/ijc.31830
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jin Young Park, H. Bas Bueno‐de‐Mesquita, Pietro Ferrari, Elisabete Weiderpass, Jordi Batlle, Anne Tjønneland, Cecilie Kyro, Vinciane Rebours, Marie‐Christine Boutron‐Ruault, Francesca Romana Mancini, Verena Katzke, Tilman Kühn, Heiner Boeing, Antonia Trichopoulou, Carlo La Vecchia, Maria Kritikou, Giovanna Masala, Valeria Pala, Rosario Tumino, Salvatore Panico, Petra H. Peeters, Guri Skeie, Susana Merino, Eric J. Duell, Miguel Rodríguez‐Barranco, Miren Dorronsoro, Maria‐Dolores Chirlaque, Eva Ardanaz, Björn Gylling, Jörn Schneede, Ulrika Ericson, Hanna Sternby, Kay‐Tee Khaw, Kathryn E. Bradbury, Inge Huybrechts, Dagfinn Aune, Paolo Vineis, Nadia Slimani

Abstract

Pancreatic cancer (PC) has an exceptionally low survival rate and primary prevention strategies are limited. Folate plays an important role in one-carbon metabolism and has been associated with the risk of several cancers, but not consistently with PC risk. We aimed to investigate the association between dietary folate intake and PC risk, using the standardised folate database across 10 European countries. A total of 477,206 participants were followed up for 11 years, during which 865 incident primary PC cases were recorded. Folate intake was energy-adjusted using the residual method. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. In multivariable analyses stratified by age, sex, study centre and adjusted for energy intake, smoking status, BMI, educational level, diabetes status, supplement use and dietary fibre intake, we found no significant association between folate intake and PC risk: the HR of PC risk for those in the highest quartile of folate intake (≥353 μg/d) compared with the lowest (<241 μg/d) was 0.81 (95% CI: 0.51, 1.31; Ptrend = 0.38). In current smokers, a positive trend was observed in PC risk across folate quartiles (HR=4.42 (95% CI: 1.05, 18.62) for ≥353 μg/d vs. <241 μg/d, Ptrend = 0.01). Nonetheless, there was no significant interaction between smoking and dietary folate intake (Pinteraction = 0.99). We found no association between dietary folate intake and PC risk in this large European study. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 19 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 19 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 26%
Student > Bachelor 2 11%
Other 1 5%
Student > Master 1 5%
Other 1 5%
Unknown 4 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 47%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 5%
Unknown 6 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 September 2018.
All research outputs
#7,621,466
of 13,536,173 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Cancer
#7,214
of 9,325 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#130,749
of 263,849 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Cancer
#49
of 107 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,536,173 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,325 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.9. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,849 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 107 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.