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Targeting Mitochondrial Function to Treat Quiescent Tumor Cells in Solid Tumors.

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Molecular Sciences, January 2015
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Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

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17 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
44 Mendeley
Title
Targeting Mitochondrial Function to Treat Quiescent Tumor Cells in Solid Tumors.
Published in
International Journal of Molecular Sciences, January 2015
DOI 10.3390/ijms161126020
Pubmed ID
Authors

Zhang, Xiaonan, de Milito, Angelo, Olofsson, Maria Hägg, Gullbo, Joachim, D'Arcy, Padraig, Linder, Stig, Xiaonan Zhang, Angelo de Milito, Maria Hägg Olofsson, Joachim Gullbo, Padraig D’Arcy, Stig Linder

Abstract

The disorganized nature of tumor vasculature results in the generation of microenvironments characterized by nutrient starvation, hypoxia and accumulation of acidic metabolites. Tumor cell populations in such areas are often slowly proliferating and thus refractory to chemotherapeutical drugs that are dependent on an active cell cycle. There is an urgent need for alternative therapeutic interventions that circumvent growth dependency. The screening of drug libraries using multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) or glucose-starved tumor cells has led to the identification of several compounds with promising therapeutic potential and that display activity on quiescent tumor cells. Interestingly, a common theme of these drug screens is the recurrent identification of agents that affect mitochondrial function. Such data suggest that, contrary to the classical Warburg view, tumor cells in nutritionally-compromised microenvironments are dependent on mitochondrial function for energy metabolism and survival. These findings suggest that mitochondria may represent an "Achilles heel" for the survival of slowly-proliferating tumor cells and suggest strategies for the development of therapy to target these cell populations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 44 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Unknown 43 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 36%
Researcher 8 18%
Student > Master 6 14%
Other 4 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 7%
Other 7 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 25%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 16%
Engineering 4 9%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 7%
Other 8 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 May 2017.
All research outputs
#8,425,525
of 11,026,397 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Molecular Sciences
#3,529
of 6,879 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#189,570
of 307,503 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Molecular Sciences
#148
of 312 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,026,397 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,879 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.5. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 307,503 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 312 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.