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Effect of prostate-specific membrane antigen positron emission tomography on the decision-making of radiation oncologists

Overview of attention for article published in Radiation Oncology, November 2015
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Title
Effect of prostate-specific membrane antigen positron emission tomography on the decision-making of radiation oncologists
Published in
Radiation Oncology, November 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13014-015-0548-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Thomas P. Shakespeare

Abstract

Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is routinely used in many cancer types, although is not yet a standard modality for prostate carcinoma. Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) PET is a promising new modality for staging prostate cancer, with recent studies showing potential advantages over traditional computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and nuclear medicine bone scan imaging. However, the impact of PSMA PET on the decision-making of radiation oncologists and outcomes after radiotherapy is yet to be determined. Our aim was to determine the impact of PSMA PET on a radiation oncologist's clinical practice. Patients in a radiation oncology clinic who underwent PSMA PET were prospectively recorded in an electronic oncology record. Patient demographics, outcomes of imaging, and impact on decision-making were evaluated. Fifty-four patients underwent PSMA PET between January and May 2015. The major reasons for undergoing PET included staging before definitive (14.8 %) or post-prostatectomy (33.3 %) radiotherapy, and investigation of PSA failures following definitive (16.7 %) or post-prostatectomy (33.3 %) radiotherapy. In 46.3 % of patients PSMA was positive after negative traditional imaging, in 9.3 % PSMA was positive after equivocal imaging, and in 13.0 % PSMA was negative after equivocal imaging. PSMA PET changed radiotherapy management in 46.3 % of cases, and hormone therapy in 33.3 % of patients, with an overall change in decision-making in 53.7 % of patients. PSMA PET has the potential to significantly alter the decision-making of radiation oncologists, and may become a valuable imaging tool in the future.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 41 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 40 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 8 20%
Researcher 7 17%
Student > Master 5 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 12%
Student > Bachelor 4 10%
Other 12 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 24 59%
Unspecified 6 15%
Chemistry 3 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 5%
Other 4 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 November 2015.
All research outputs
#7,053,327
of 8,163,518 outputs
Outputs from Radiation Oncology
#969
of 1,081 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#242,193
of 294,457 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Radiation Oncology
#38
of 58 outputs
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We're also able to compare this research output to 58 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.