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Aerobic biodegradation potential of endocrine‐disrupting chemicals in surface‐water sediment at Rocky Mountain National Park, USA

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry, March 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
2 policy sources
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
12 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
37 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
Aerobic biodegradation potential of endocrine‐disrupting chemicals in surface‐water sediment at Rocky Mountain National Park, USA
Published in
Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry, March 2016
DOI 10.1002/etc.3266
Pubmed ID
Authors

Paul M. Bradley, William A. Battaglin, Luke R. Iwanowicz, Jimmy M. Clark, Celeste A. Journey

Abstract

Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC) in surface water and bed sediment threaten the structure and function of aquatic ecosystems. In natural, remote, and protected surface-water environments where contaminant releases are sporadic, contaminant biodegradation is a fundamental driver of exposure concentration, timing, duration, and, thus, EDC ecological risk. Anthropogenic contaminants, including known and suspected EDC, were detected in surface water and sediment collected from 2 streams and 2 lakes in Rocky Mountains National Park (ROMO). The potential for aerobic EDC biodegradation was assessed in collected sediments using 6 (14) C-radiolabeled model compounds. Aerobic microbial mineralization of natural (estrone and 17β-estradiol) and synthetic (17α-ethinylestradiol) estrogen was significant at all sites. ROMO bed sediment microbial communities also effectively degraded the xenoestrogens, bisphenol-A and 4-nonylphenol. The same sediment samples exhibited little potential for aerobic biodegradation of triclocarban, however, illustrating the need to assess a wider range of contaminant compounds. The current results support recent concerns over the widespread environmental occurrence of carbanalide antibacterials, like triclocarban and triclosan, and suggest that backcountry use of products containing these compounds should be discouraged. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 37 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 30%
Student > Master 8 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 19%
Student > Bachelor 3 8%
Other 2 5%
Other 3 8%
Unknown 3 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 14 38%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 11%
Chemistry 3 8%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 3%
Other 3 8%
Unknown 8 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 December 2020.
All research outputs
#3,866,005
of 19,529,814 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry
#570
of 5,104 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#80,476
of 388,572 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry
#13
of 81 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,529,814 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 80th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,104 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 388,572 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 81 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.