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Tropical peatland carbon storage linked to global latitudinal trends in peat recalcitrance

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Communications, September 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
5 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
165 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
21 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
121 Mendeley
Title
Tropical peatland carbon storage linked to global latitudinal trends in peat recalcitrance
Published in
Nature Communications, September 2018
DOI 10.1038/s41467-018-06050-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Suzanne B. Hodgkins, Curtis J. Richardson, René Dommain, Hongjun Wang, Paul H. Glaser, Brittany Verbeke, B. Rose Winkler, Alexander R. Cobb, Virginia I. Rich, Malak Missilmani, Neal Flanagan, Mengchi Ho, Alison M. Hoyt, Charles F. Harvey, S. Rose Vining, Moira A. Hough, Tim R. Moore, Pierre J. H. Richard, Florentino B. De La Cruz, Joumana Toufaily, Rasha Hamdan, William T. Cooper, Jeffrey P. Chanton

Abstract

Peatlands represent large terrestrial carbon banks. Given that most peat accumulates in boreal regions, where low temperatures and water saturation preserve organic matter, the existence of peat in (sub)tropical regions remains enigmatic. Here we examined peat and plant chemistry across a latitudinal transect from the Arctic to the tropics. Near-surface low-latitude peat has lower carbohydrate and greater aromatic content than near-surface high-latitude peat, creating a reduced oxidation state and resulting recalcitrance. This recalcitrance allows peat to persist in the (sub)tropics despite warm temperatures. Because we observed similar declines in carbohydrate content with depth in high-latitude peat, our data explain recent field-scale deep peat warming experiments in which catotelm (deeper) peat remained stable despite temperature increases up to 9 °C. We suggest that high-latitude deep peat reservoirs may be stabilized in the face of climate change by their ultimately lower carbohydrate and higher aromatic composition, similar to tropical peats.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 165 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 121 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 121 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 33 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 26 21%
Student > Bachelor 13 11%
Student > Master 8 7%
Professor > Associate Professor 6 5%
Other 17 14%
Unknown 18 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 42 35%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 18 15%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 12 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 3%
Chemistry 3 2%
Other 11 9%
Unknown 31 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 149. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 February 2020.
All research outputs
#121,479
of 15,153,124 outputs
Outputs from Nature Communications
#1,807
of 28,494 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,346
of 274,200 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Communications
#1
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,153,124 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 28,494 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 48.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,200 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them