↓ Skip to main content

Gains attained in malaria control coverage within settings earmarked for pre-elimination: malaria indicator and prevalence surveys 2012, Eritrea

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, November 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (78th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (79th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
9 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
10 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
63 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Gains attained in malaria control coverage within settings earmarked for pre-elimination: malaria indicator and prevalence surveys 2012, Eritrea
Published in
Malaria Journal, November 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12936-015-0992-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Araia Berhane, Selam Mihreteab, Hagos Ahmed, Assefash Zehaie, Usman Abdulmumini, Emmanuel Chanda

Abstract

Eritrea, like most countries in sub-Saharan Africa, has expended much effort towards malaria control with the view of transitioning from reduction of the disease burden to elimination. This paper reports on the level of achievement as highlighted by the follow-on, malaria-endemic area representative, survey that aimed to provide data and to assess progress on malaria indicators and parasite prevalence at household level across the country. In 2012, data were collected using a two-stage stratified cluster random sample of 1887 households in 96 clusters (villages in rural areas and census enumeration areas in urban centers) during a malaria indicator and prevalence survey in Eritrea. The survey determined parasite prevalence in vulnerable population groups and evaluated coverage, use and access to malaria control services. Standardized Roll-Back Malaria Monitoring and Evaluation Reference Group household and women's questionnaires were adapted to the local situation and used for collection of data that were analysed and summarized using descriptive statistics. The results of the survey showed that 90 % (95 % CI 89-91) of households owned at least one mosquito net. The proportion of the population with access to an insecticide-treated net (ITN) in their household was 55 % (95 % CI 54-56). The utilization of ITNs was 67 % (95 % CI 65-70) for children under 5 years and 60 % (95 % CI 58-63) for pregnant women (OR: 0. 73(95 % CI 0.62-0.85); P = 0.52). Only 28 % (95 % CI 26-30) of households were covered by indoor residual spraying (IRS) the previous year with significant heterogeneity by zoba (Debub 50 % (95 % CI 45-54) vs Gash Barka 32 % (95 % CI 28-36); OR = 0. 47 (95 % CI 0.36-0.61), P = 0.05). Malaria parasite prevalence was low; 1.1 % (95 % CI 0.9-1.3) in the general population and 1.4 % (95 % CI 1.0-2.0) in children under five and 0.7 % (95 % CI 0.4-1.1) among women aged 15-49 years. Only 19 % (95 % CI 15-26) of children under five had fever in the 2 weeks preceding the survey, with 61 % (95 % CI 54.1-67.1) seeking treatment from a health facility. Data on knowledge levels show that 92 % reported that malaria is transmitted by mosquitoes, 92 % mentioned that the use of mosquito nets could prevent malaria, 47 % knew malaria prevention medication, 83 % cited fever as a sign and symptom of malaria, and 35 % had heard or seen malaria awareness messages. Notwithstanding confounders, the observed low malaria parasite prevalence could be associated with malaria intervention coverage, access and utilization as well as high and equitable knowledge levels in the population. This indicates that Eritrea is on the right track towards pre-elimination. However, technical and infrastructure capacity should be strengthened to facilitate implementation, surveillance, monitoring, and evaluation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 63 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 1 2%
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 61 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 13 21%
Researcher 12 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 16%
Student > Bachelor 8 13%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 5%
Other 10 16%
Unknown 7 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 22%
Social Sciences 10 16%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 5%
Other 12 19%
Unknown 8 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 May 2018.
All research outputs
#3,668,455
of 15,703,527 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#979
of 4,447 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#79,392
of 366,594 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#91
of 451 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,703,527 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,447 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 366,594 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 451 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.