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Etiologies of conjugated hyperbilirubinemia in infancy: a systematic review of 1692 subjects

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pediatrics, November 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (62nd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (62nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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34 Dimensions

Readers on

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88 Mendeley
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Title
Etiologies of conjugated hyperbilirubinemia in infancy: a systematic review of 1692 subjects
Published in
BMC Pediatrics, November 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12887-015-0506-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lena E. Gottesman, Michael T. Del Vecchio, Stephen C. Aronoff

Abstract

The etiologies of conjugated hyperbilirubinemia in infancy are diverse. Determine the prevalence rates of the specific etiologies of conjugated hyperbilirubinemia in infancy. EMBASE and Pubmed were searched electronically and the bibliographies of selected studies were search manually. The search was conducted independently by two authors. (1) prospective or retrospective case series or cohort study with 10 or more subjects; (2) consecutive infants who presented with conjugated hyperbilirubinemia; (3) subjects underwent appropriate diagnostic work-up for conjugated hyperbilirubinemia; (4) no specific diagnoses were excluded in the studied cohort. Patient number, age range, country of origin, and categorical and specific etiologies. From 237 studies identified, 17 studies encompassing 1692 infants were selected. Idiopathic neonatal hepatitis (INH) occurred in 26.0 % of cases; the most common specific etiologies were extrahepatic biliary atresia (EHBA) (25.89 %), infection (11.47 %), TPN- associated cholestasis (6.44 %), metabolic disease (4.37 %), alpha-1 anti-trypsin deficiency (4.14 %), and perinatal hypoxia/ischemia (3.66 %). CMV was the most common infection identified (31.51 %) and galactosemia (36.49 %) was the most common metabolic disease identified. Major limitations are: (1) inconsistencies in the diagnostic evaluations among the different studies and (2) variations among the sample populations. INH is the most common diagnosis for conjugated hyperbilirubinemia in infancy while EHBA and infection are the most commonly identified etiologies. The present review is intended to be a guide to the differential diagnosis and evaluation of the infant presenting with conjugated hyperbilirubinemia.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 88 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 1%
Unknown 87 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 17%
Student > Postgraduate 13 15%
Student > Bachelor 11 13%
Other 10 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 7%
Other 15 17%
Unknown 18 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 47 53%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 3%
Arts and Humanities 1 1%
Other 4 5%
Unknown 21 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 July 2019.
All research outputs
#8,211,143
of 15,640,884 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pediatrics
#995
of 1,963 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#135,344
of 366,431 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pediatrics
#63
of 166 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,640,884 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,963 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.1. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 366,431 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 166 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.