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The opioid effects of gluten exorphins: asymptomatic celiac disease

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Health, Population, & Nutrition, November 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#4 of 374)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
twitter
64 tweeters
facebook
15 Facebook pages
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
17 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
119 Mendeley
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Title
The opioid effects of gluten exorphins: asymptomatic celiac disease
Published in
Journal of Health, Population, & Nutrition, November 2015
DOI 10.1186/s41043-015-0032-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Leo Pruimboom, Karin de Punder

Abstract

Gluten-containing cereals are a main food staple present in the daily human diet, including wheat, barley, and rye. Gluten intake is associated with the development of celiac disease (CD) and related disorders such as diabetes mellitus type I, depression, and schizophrenia. However, until now, there is no consent about the possible deleterious effects of gluten intake because of often failing symptoms even in persons with proven CD. Asymptomatic CD (ACD) is present in the majority of affected patients and is characterized by the absence of classical gluten-intolerance signs, such as diarrhea, bloating, and abdominal pain. Nevertheless, these individuals very often develop diseases that can be related with gluten intake. Gluten can be degraded into several morphine-like substances, named gluten exorphins. These compounds have proven opioid effects and could mask the deleterious effects of gluten protein on gastrointestinal lining and function. Here we describe a putative mechanism, explaining how gluten could "mask" its own toxicity by exorphins that are produced through gluten protein digestion.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 64 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 119 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Unknown 117 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 26 22%
Student > Master 22 18%
Researcher 13 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 7%
Student > Postgraduate 7 6%
Other 27 23%
Unknown 16 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 35 29%
Nursing and Health Professions 17 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 12 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 10%
Neuroscience 8 7%
Other 19 16%
Unknown 16 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 66. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 October 2020.
All research outputs
#359,342
of 16,304,436 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Health, Population, & Nutrition
#4
of 374 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#9,891
of 369,587 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Health, Population, & Nutrition
#1
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,304,436 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 374 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 369,587 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.