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Using second harmonic generation to predict patient outcome in solid tumors

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, November 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#47 of 3,607)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
17 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
33 Mendeley
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Title
Using second harmonic generation to predict patient outcome in solid tumors
Published in
BMC Cancer, November 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12885-015-1911-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

K. Burke, M. Smid, R. P. Dawes, M. A. Timmermans, P. Salzman, C. H. M. van Deurzen, David G. Beer, J. A. Foekens, E. Brown

Abstract

Over-treatment of estrogen receptor positive (ER+), lymph node-negative (LNN) breast cancer patients with chemotherapy is a pressing clinical problem that can be addressed by improving techniques to predict tumor metastatic potential. Here we demonstrate that analysis of second harmonic generation (SHG) emission direction in primary tumor biopsies can provide prognostic information about the metastatic outcome of ER+, LNN breast cancer, as well as stage 1 colorectal adenocarcinoma. SHG is an optical signal produced by fibrillar collagen. The ratio of the forward-to-backward emitted SHG signals (F/B) is sensitive to changes in structure of individual collagen fibers. F/B from excised primary tumor tissue was measured in a retrospective study of LNN breast cancer patients who had received no adjuvant systemic therapy and related to metastasis-free survival (MFS) and overall survival (OS) rates. In addition, F/B was studied for its association with the length of progression-free survival (PFS) in a subgroup of ER+ patients who received tamoxifen as first-line treatment for recurrent disease, and for its relation with OS in stage I colorectal and stage 1 lung adenocarcinoma patients. In 125 ER+, but not in 96 ER-negative (ER-), LNN breast cancer patients an increased F/B was significantly associated with a favorable MFS and OS (log rank trend for MFS: p = 0.004 and for OS: p = 0.03). On the other hand, an increased F/B was associated with shorter PFS in 60 ER+ recurrent breast cancer patients treated with tamoxifen (log rank trend p = 0.02). In stage I colorectal adenocarcinoma, an increased F/B was significantly related to poor OS (log rank trend p = 0.03), however this relationship was not statistically significant in stage I lung adenocarcinoma. Within ER+, LNN breast cancer specimens the F/B can stratify patients based upon their potential for tumor aggressiveness. This offers a "matrix-focused" method to predict metastatic outcome that is complementary to genomic "cell-focused" methods. In combination, this and other methods may contribute to improved metastatic prediction, and hence may help to reduce patient over-treatment.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 33 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 21%
Researcher 7 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 6%
Other 4 12%
Unknown 4 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 21%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 15%
Engineering 4 12%
Physics and Astronomy 4 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 6%
Other 6 18%
Unknown 5 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 26. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 December 2015.
All research outputs
#380,408
of 8,760,756 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#47
of 3,607 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#17,624
of 301,045 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#2
of 318 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,760,756 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,607 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 301,045 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 318 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.