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Nutritional advice for improving outcomes in multiple pregnancies

Overview of attention for article published in Cochrane database of systematic reviews, November 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (78th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
policy
1 policy source
twitter
47 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
120 Mendeley
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Title
Nutritional advice for improving outcomes in multiple pregnancies
Published in
Cochrane database of systematic reviews, November 2015
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd008867.pub3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Leanne Bricker, Keith Reed, Lorna Wood, James P Neilson

Abstract

Multiple pregnancies are associated with higher rates of perinatal mortality and morbidity than singleton pregnancies, mainly due to an increased risk of preterm birth. Because fetal outcome is best at a particular range of maternal weight gain, it has been suggested that women with multiple pregnancies should take special diets (particularly high-calorie diets) designed to boost weight gain. However, 'optimal weight gain' in the mother in retrospective studies may merely reflect good growth of her babies and delivery at or near term (both associated with a good outcome) and artificially boosting weight gain by nutritional input may confer no advantage. Indeed, a high-calorie diet may be unpleasant to consume, and could lead to long-term problems of being overweight. It is therefore important to establish if specialised diets are actually of benefit to women with multiple pregnancies and their babies. To assess the effects of specialised diets or nutritional advice for women with multiple pregnancies (two or more fetuses). We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (15 June 2015). Randomised controlled trials, 'quasi-random' studies, and cluster-randomised trials of women with multiple pregnancies (two or more fetuses) either nulliparous or multiparous and their babies. Cross-over trials and studies reported only as abstracts were not eligible for inclusion. We identified no trials for inclusion in this review. A comprehensive search of the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register found no potentially eligible trial reports. There is no robust evidence from randomised trials to indicate whether specialised diets or nutritional advice for women with multiple pregnancies do more good than harm. There is a clear need to undertake a randomised controlled trial.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 47 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 120 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
India 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Unknown 117 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 29 24%
Student > Bachelor 24 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 13%
Researcher 11 9%
Student > Postgraduate 9 8%
Other 19 16%
Unknown 13 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 54 45%
Nursing and Health Professions 19 16%
Social Sciences 6 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 4%
Other 10 8%
Unknown 21 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 45. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 January 2020.
All research outputs
#572,130
of 17,431,796 outputs
Outputs from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#1,404
of 11,686 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#14,637
of 373,407 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#47
of 214 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,431,796 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 11,686 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 25.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 373,407 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 214 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.