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Morphodynamic evolution following sediment release from the world’s largest dam removal

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, September 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
19 tweeters

Citations

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29 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
79 Mendeley
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Title
Morphodynamic evolution following sediment release from the world’s largest dam removal
Published in
Scientific Reports, September 2018
DOI 10.1038/s41598-018-30817-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andrew C. Ritchie, Jonathan A. Warrick, Amy E. East, Christopher S. Magirl, Andrew W. Stevens, Jennifer A. Bountry, Timothy J. Randle, Christopher A. Curran, Robert C. Hilldale, Jeffrey J. Duda, Guy R. Gelfenbaum, Ian M. Miller, George R. Pess, Melissa M. Foley, Randall McCoy, Andrea S. Ogston

Abstract

Sediment pulses can cause widespread, complex changes to rivers and coastal regions. Quantifying landscape response to sediment-supply changes is a long-standing problem in geomorphology, but the unanticipated nature of most sediment pulses rarely allows for detailed measurement of associated landscape processes and evolution. The intentional removal of two large dams on the Elwha River (Washington, USA) exposed ~30 Mt of impounded sediment to fluvial erosion, presenting a unique opportunity to quantify source-to-sink river and coastal responses to a massive sediment-source perturbation. Here we evaluate geomorphic evolution during and after the sediment pulse, presenting a 5-year sediment budget and morphodynamic analysis of the Elwha River and its delta. Approximately 65% of the sediment was eroded, of which only ~10% was deposited in the fluvial system. This restored fluvial supply of sand, gravel, and wood substantially changed the channel morphology. The remaining ~90% of the released sediment was transported to the coast, causing ~60 ha of delta growth. Although metrics of geomorphic change did not follow simple time-coherent paths, many signals peaked 1-2 years after the start of dam removal, indicating combined impulse and step-change disturbance responses.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 19 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 79 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 79 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 19%
Researcher 14 18%
Student > Bachelor 13 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 14%
Other 6 8%
Other 11 14%
Unknown 9 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 26 33%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 15 19%
Engineering 11 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 1%
Other 5 6%
Unknown 15 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 16. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2020.
All research outputs
#1,432,803
of 17,153,337 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#13,077
of 91,788 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#37,426
of 281,755 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#4
of 49 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,153,337 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 91,788 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 281,755 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 49 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.