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Did homeobox gene duplications contribute to the Cambrian explosion?

Overview of attention for article published in Zoological Letters, January 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#43 of 109)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (78th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (77th percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters
googleplus
3 Google+ users
video
1 video uploader

Citations

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28 Dimensions

Readers on

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89 Mendeley
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Title
Did homeobox gene duplications contribute to the Cambrian explosion?
Published in
Zoological Letters, January 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40851-014-0004-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Peter W H Holland

Abstract

The Cambrian explosion describes an apparently rapid increase in the diversity of bilaterian animals around 540-515 million years ago. Bilaterian animals explore the world in three-dimensions deploying forward-facing sense organs, a brain, and an anterior mouth; they possess muscle blocks enabling efficient crawling and burrowing in sediments, and they typically have an efficient 'through-gut' with separate mouth and anus to process bulk food and eject waste, even when burrowing in sediment. A variety of ecological, environmental, genetic, and developmental factors have been proposed as possible triggers and correlates of the Cambrian explosion, and it is likely that a combination of factors were involved. Here, I focus on a set of developmental genetic changes and propose these are part of the mix of permissive factors. I describe how ANTP-class homeobox genes, which encode transcription factors involved in body patterning, increased in number in the bilaterian stem lineage and earlier. These gene duplications generated a large array of ANTP class genes, including three distinct gene clusters called NK, Hox, and ParaHox. Comparative data supports the idea that NK genes were deployed primarily to pattern the bilaterian mesoderm, Hox genes coded position along the central nervous system, and ParaHox genes most likely originally specified the mouth, midgut, and anus of the newly evolved through-gut. It is proposed that diversification of ANTP class genes played a role in the Cambrian explosion by contributing to the patterning systems used to build animal bodies capable of high-energy directed locomotion, including active burrowing.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 89 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 2 2%
Brazil 1 1%
Chile 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Saudi Arabia 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Unknown 82 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 27 30%
Researcher 16 18%
Student > Master 8 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 9%
Other 12 13%
Unknown 10 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 42 47%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 20 22%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 8 9%
Environmental Science 2 2%
Computer Science 1 1%
Other 7 8%
Unknown 9 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 May 2018.
All research outputs
#2,934,710
of 12,978,017 outputs
Outputs from Zoological Letters
#43
of 109 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#75,922
of 352,593 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Zoological Letters
#7
of 31 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,978,017 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 109 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 352,593 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 31 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.