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A Climatic Stability Approach to Prioritizing Global Conservation Investments

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, November 2010
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (77th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
37 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
177 Mendeley
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Title
A Climatic Stability Approach to Prioritizing Global Conservation Investments
Published in
PLoS ONE, November 2010
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0015103
Pubmed ID
Authors

Takuya Iwamura, Kerrie A. Wilson, Oscar Venter, Hugh P. Possingham

Abstract

Climate change is impacting species and ecosystems globally. Many existing templates to identify the most important areas to conserve terrestrial biodiversity at the global scale neglect the future impacts of climate change. Unstable climatic conditions are predicted to undermine conservation investments in the future. This paper presents an approach to developing a resource allocation algorithm for conservation investment that incorporates the ecological stability of ecoregions under climate change. We discover that allocating funds in this way changes the optimal schedule of global investments both spatially and temporally. This allocation reduces the biodiversity loss of terrestrial endemic species from protected areas due to climate change by 22% for the period of 2002-2052, when compared to allocations that do not consider climate change. To maximize the resilience of global biodiversity to climate change we recommend that funding be increased in ecoregions located in the tropics and/or mid-elevation habitats, where climatic conditions are predicted to remain relatively stable. Accounting for the ecological stability of ecoregions provides a realistic approach to incorporating climate change into global conservation planning, with potential to save more species from extinction in the long term.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 177 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 4 2%
United States 3 2%
Italy 3 2%
Austria 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Finland 1 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
Other 8 5%
Unknown 153 86%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 51 29%
Student > Master 33 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 13%
Student > Bachelor 15 8%
Other 12 7%
Other 43 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 79 45%
Environmental Science 65 37%
Unspecified 14 8%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 6 3%
Social Sciences 5 3%
Other 8 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 September 2013.
All research outputs
#2,747,567
of 12,105,155 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#35,649
of 133,159 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#50,835
of 256,401 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#846
of 3,684 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,105,155 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 133,159 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 256,401 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3,684 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.