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Can previously sedentary females use the feeling scale to regulate exercise intensity in a gym environment? an observational study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation, November 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
12 tweeters

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

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36 Mendeley
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Title
Can previously sedentary females use the feeling scale to regulate exercise intensity in a gym environment? an observational study
Published in
BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation, November 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13102-015-0023-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Charlotte C. Hamlyn-Williams, Gavin Tempest, Sarah Coombs, Gaynor Parfitt

Abstract

Recent research suggests that the Feeling Scale (FS) can be used as a method of exercise intensity regulation to maintain a positive affective response during exercise. However, research to date has been carried out in laboratories and is not representative of natural exercise environments. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether sedentary women can self-regulate their exercise intensity using the FS to experience positive affective responses in a gym environment using their own choice of exercise mode; cycling or treadmill. Fourteen females (24.9 years ± 5.2; height 166.7 ± 5.7 cm; mass 66.3 ± 13.4 kg; BMI 24.1 ± 5.5)) completed a submaximal exercise test and each individual's ventilatory threshold ([Formula: see text]) was identified. Following this, three 20 min gym-based exercise trials, either on a bike or treadmill were performed at an intensity that was self-selected and perceived to correspond to the FS value of +3 (good). Oxygen uptake, heart rate (HR) and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were measured during exercise at the participants chosen intensity. Results indicated that on average participants worked close to their [Formula: see text] and increased their exercise intensity during the 20-min session. Participants worked physiologically harder during cycling exercise. Consistency of oxygen uptake, HR and RPE across the exercise trials was high. The data indicate that previously sedentary women can use the FS in an ecological setting to regulate their exercise intensity and that regulating intensity to feel 'good' should lead to individuals exercising at an intensity that would result in cardiovascular gains if maintained.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 2 6%
United States 1 3%
Netherlands 1 3%
Spain 1 3%
Unknown 31 86%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 33%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 11%
Professor 3 8%
Lecturer 2 6%
Student > Bachelor 2 6%
Other 9 25%
Unknown 4 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 13 36%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 8%
Social Sciences 3 8%
Neuroscience 2 6%
Psychology 2 6%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 9 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 December 2015.
All research outputs
#1,616,349
of 11,342,318 outputs
Outputs from BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation
#61
of 167 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#54,211
of 309,582 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation
#3
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,342,318 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 167 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 309,582 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.