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A paper and plastic device for the combined isothermal amplification and lateral flow detection of Plasmodium DNA

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, November 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

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32 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
126 Mendeley
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Title
A paper and plastic device for the combined isothermal amplification and lateral flow detection of Plasmodium DNA
Published in
Malaria Journal, November 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12936-015-0995-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Michael S. Cordray, Rebecca R. Richards-Kortum

Abstract

Isothermal amplification techniques are emerging as a promising method for malaria diagnosis since they are capable of detecting extremely low concentrations of parasite target while mitigating the need for infrastructure and training required by other nucleic acid based tests. Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) is promising for further development since it operates in a short time frame (<30 min) and produces a product that can be visually detected on a lateral flow dipstick. A self-sealing paper and plastic system that performs both the amplification and detection of a malaria DNA sequence is presented. Primers were designed using the NCBI nBLAST tools and screened using gel electrophoresis. Paper and plastic devices were prototyped using commercial design software and parts were cut using a laser cutter and assembled by hand. Synthetic copies of the Plasmodium 18S gene were spiked into solution and used as targets for the RPA reaction. To test the performance of the device the same samples spiked with synthetic target were run in parallel both in the paper and plastic devices and using conventional bench top methods. Novel RPA primers were developed that bind to sequences present in the four species of Plasmodium which infect humans. The paper and plastic devices were found to be capable of detecting as few as 5 copies/µL of synthetic Plasmodium DNA (50 copies total), comparable to the same reaction run on the bench top. The devices produce visual results in an hour, cost approximately $1, and are self-contained once the device is sealed. The device was capable of carrying out the RPA reaction and detecting meaningful amounts of synthetic Plasmodium DNA in a self-sealing and self-contained device. This device may be a step towards making nucleic acid tests more accessible for malaria detection.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 126 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Hungary 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 123 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 31 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 27 21%
Researcher 22 17%
Student > Bachelor 14 11%
Professor 7 6%
Other 17 13%
Unknown 8 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 30 24%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 27 21%
Engineering 15 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 8%
Chemistry 9 7%
Other 19 15%
Unknown 16 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 19. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 December 2015.
All research outputs
#590,926
of 11,341,899 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#133
of 3,353 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#23,424
of 310,311 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#5
of 164 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,341,899 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,353 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 310,311 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 164 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.