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A metagenetic approach to determine the diversity and distribution of cyst nematodes at the level of the country, the field and the individual

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Ecology, November 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (72nd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
12 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
15 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
49 Mendeley
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Title
A metagenetic approach to determine the diversity and distribution of cyst nematodes at the level of the country, the field and the individual
Published in
Molecular Ecology, November 2015
DOI 10.1111/mec.13434
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sebastian Eves-van den Akker, Catherine J. Lilley, Alex Reid, Jon Pickup, Eric Anderson, Peter J.A. Cock, Mark Blaxter, Peter E. Urwin, John T. Jones, Vivian C. Blok

Abstract

Distinct populations of the potato cyst nematode (PCN) Globodera pallida exist in the UK that differ in their ability to overcome various sources of resistance. An efficient method for distinguishing between populations would enable pathogen-informed cultivar choice in the field. Science and Advice for Scottish Agriculture (SASA) annually undertake national DNA diagnostic tests to determine the presence of PCN in potato seed and ware land by extracting DNA from soil floats. These DNA samples provide a unique resource for monitoring the distribution of PCN and further interrogation of the diversity within species. We identify a region of mitochondrial DNA descriptive of three main groups of G. pallida present in the UK and adopt a metagenetic approach to the sequencing and analysis of all SASA samples simultaneously. Using this approach, we describe the distribution of G. pallida mitotypes across Scotland with field-scale resolution. Most fields contain a single mitotype, one-fifth contain a mix of mitotypes, and less than 3% contain all three mitotypes. Within mixed fields, we were able to quantify the relative abundance of each mitotype across an order of magnitude. Local areas within mixed fields are dominated by certain mitotypes and indicate towards a complex underlying 'pathoscape'. Finally, we assess mitotype distribution at the level of the individual cyst and provide evidence of 'hybrids'. This study provides a method for accurate, quantitative and high-throughput typing of up to one thousand fields simultaneously, while revealing novel insights into the national genetic variability of an economically important plant parasite.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 49 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 2%
Serbia 1 2%
Unknown 47 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 14 29%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 12%
Student > Master 6 12%
Student > Bachelor 3 6%
Other 3 6%
Other 7 14%
Unknown 10 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 26 53%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 4%
Environmental Science 2 4%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 4%
Other 4 8%
Unknown 9 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 April 2016.
All research outputs
#971,569
of 12,354,212 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Ecology
#669
of 4,162 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#32,963
of 324,068 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Ecology
#37
of 134 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,354,212 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,162 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 324,068 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 134 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.