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TP53 Outperforms Other Androgen Receptor Biomarkers to Predict Abiraterone or Enzalutamide Outcome in Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Cancer Research, September 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (82nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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36 tweeters

Citations

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57 Dimensions

Readers on

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82 Mendeley
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Title
TP53 Outperforms Other Androgen Receptor Biomarkers to Predict Abiraterone or Enzalutamide Outcome in Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer
Published in
Clinical Cancer Research, September 2018
DOI 10.1158/1078-0432.ccr-18-1943
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bram De Laere, Steffi Oeyen, Markus Mayrhofer, Tom Whitington, Pieter-Jan van Dam, Peter Van Oyen, Christophe Ghysel, Jozef Ampe, Piet Ost, Wim Demey, Lucien Hoekx, Dirk Schrijvers, Barbara Brouwers, Willem Lybaert, Els G. Everaert, Daan De Maeseneer, Michiel Strijbos, Alain Bols, Karen Fransis, Nick Beije, Inge E. de Kruijff, Valerie van Dam, Anja Brouwer, Dirk Goossens, Lien Heyrman, Gert G. Van den Eynden, Annemie Rutten, Jurgen Del Favero, Mattias Rantalainen, Prabhakar Rajan, Stefan Sleijfer, Anders Ullén, Jeffrey Yachnin, Henrik Grönberg, Steven J. Van Laere, Johan Lindberg, Luc Y. Dirix

Abstract

To infer the prognostic value of simultaneous androgen receptor (AR) and TP53 profiling in liquid biopsies from metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients starting a new line of AR signalling inhibitors (ARSi). Between March 2014 and April 2017, we recruited mCRPC patients (n=168) prior to ARSi in a cohort study encompassing 10 European centres. Blood samples were collected for comprehensive profiling of CellSearch-enriched circulating tumour cells (CTCs) and circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA). Targeted CTC RNA-seq allowed the detection of eight AR splice variants (ARVs). Low-pass whole-genome and targeted gene-body sequencing of AR and TP53 was applied to identify amplifications, loss-of-heterozygosity, mutations and structural rearrangements in ctDNA. Clinical or radiological progression-free survival (PFS) was estimated by Kaplan-Meier analysis, and independent associations were determined using multivariable Cox-regression models. Overall, no single AR perturbation remained associated with adverse prognosis after multivariable analysis. Instead, tumour burden estimates (CTC counts, ctDNA fraction, and visceral metastases) were significantly associated with PFS. TP53 inactivation harbored independent prognostic value (HR 1.88, 95%CI 1.18-3.00, p = 0.008), and outperformed ARV expression and detection of genomic AR alterations. Using Cox coefficient analysis of clinical parameters and TP53 status, we identified three prognostic groups with differing PFS estimates (median, 14.7 vs 7.51 vs 2.62 months, p < 0.0001), which was validated in an independent mCRPC cohort (n=202) starting first-line ARSi (median, 14.3 vs 6.39 vs 2.23 months, p < 0.0001). In an all-comer cohort, tumour burden estimates and TP53 outperform any AR perturbation to infer prognosis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 36 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 82 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 82 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 17 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 18%
Student > Bachelor 11 13%
Student > Master 10 12%
Other 5 6%
Other 9 11%
Unknown 15 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 25 30%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 23 28%
Engineering 3 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 4%
Arts and Humanities 1 1%
Other 8 10%
Unknown 19 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 19. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 May 2020.
All research outputs
#1,204,201
of 17,370,809 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Cancer Research
#867
of 11,148 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#31,697
of 282,022 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Cancer Research
#35
of 190 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,370,809 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 11,148 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 282,022 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 190 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.