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Unprecedented Melioidosis Cases in Northern Australia Caused by an Asian Burkholderia pseudomallei Strain Identified by Using Large-Scale Comparative Genomics

Overview of attention for article published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, November 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (78th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
8 tweeters

Citations

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35 Dimensions

Readers on

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19 Mendeley
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Title
Unprecedented Melioidosis Cases in Northern Australia Caused by an Asian Burkholderia pseudomallei Strain Identified by Using Large-Scale Comparative Genomics
Published in
Applied and Environmental Microbiology, November 2015
DOI 10.1128/aem.03013-15
Pubmed ID
Authors

Erin P. Price, Derek S. Sarovich, Emma J. Smith, Barbara MacHunter, Glenda Harrington, Vanessa Theobald, Carina M. Hall, Heidie M. Hornstra, Evan McRobb, Yuwana Podin, Mark Mayo, Jason W. Sahl, David M. Wagner, Paul Keim, Mirjam Kaestli, Bart J. Currie

Abstract

Melioidosis is a disease of humans and animals that is caused by the saprophytic bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei. Once thought to be confined to limited locations, the known presence of B. pseudomallei is expanding as more regions of endemicity are uncovered. There is no vaccine for melioidosis, and mortality remains as high as 40% in some endemic regions, even with antibiotic administration. Despite high levels of recombination, phylogenetic reconstruction of B. pseudomallei populations using whole-genome sequencing (WGS) has revealed surprisingly robust biogeographic separation between isolates from Australia and Asia. To date, there have been no confirmed autochthonous melioidosis cases in Australia caused by an Asian isolate; likewise, no autochthonous cases in Asia have been identified as Australian in origin. Here, we used comparative genomic analysis of 455 B. pseudomallei genomes to confirm the unprecedented presence of an Asian clone, sequence type (ST) 562, in Darwin, northern Australia. First observed in 2005, the incidence of melioidosis cases attributable to ST-562 infection has steadily risen, and it is now a common Darwin strain. Intriguingly, Australian ST-562 appears to be geographically restricted to a single locale and is genetically less diverse than other common STs from this region, indicating a recent introduction of this clone into northern Australia. Detailed genomic and epidemiological investigation of new clinical and environmental B. pseudomallei isolates in the Darwin region, and ST-562 isolates from Asia, will be critical for understanding the origin, distribution and dissemination of this emerging clone in northern Australia.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 19 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 19 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 4 21%
Student > Bachelor 3 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 16%
Researcher 3 16%
Other 2 11%
Other 2 11%
Unknown 2 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 32%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 11%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 11%
Decision Sciences 1 5%
Other 1 5%
Unknown 2 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 March 2020.
All research outputs
#3,494,725
of 17,388,379 outputs
Outputs from Applied and Environmental Microbiology
#3,155
of 15,569 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#79,084
of 373,370 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Applied and Environmental Microbiology
#43
of 173 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,388,379 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 15,569 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 373,370 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 173 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.