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The influence of (central) auditory processing disorder in speech sound disorders

Overview of attention for article published in Brazilian Journal of Otorhinolaryngology, January 2016
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Title
The influence of (central) auditory processing disorder in speech sound disorders
Published in
Brazilian Journal of Otorhinolaryngology, January 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.bjorl.2015.01.008
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tatiane Faria Barrozo, Luciana de Oliveira Pagan-Neves, Nadia Vilela, Renata Mota Mamede Carvallo, Haydée Fiszbein Wertzner

Abstract

Considering the importance of auditory information for the acquisition and organization of phonological rules, the assessment of (central) auditory processing contributes to both the diagnosis and targeting of speech therapy in children with speech sound disorders. To study phonological measures and (central) auditory processing of children with speech sound disorder. Clinical and experimental study, with 21 subjects with speech sound disorder aged between 7.0 and 9.11 years, divided into two groups according to their (central) auditory processing disorder. The assessment comprised tests of phonology, speech inconsistency, and metalinguistic abilities. The group with (central) auditory processing disorder demonstrated greater severity of speech sound disorder. The cutoff value obtained for the process density index was the one that best characterized the occurrence of phonological processes for children above 7 years of age. The comparison among the tests evaluated between the two groups showed differences in some phonological and metalinguistic abilities. Children with an index value above 0.54 demonstrated strong tendencies towards presenting a (central) auditory processing disorder, and this measure was effective to indicate the need for evaluation in children with speech sound disorder.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 76 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 76 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 23 30%
Student > Master 7 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 9%
Student > Postgraduate 6 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 8%
Other 15 20%
Unknown 12 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 24 32%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 9%
Linguistics 7 9%
Psychology 4 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 5%
Other 14 18%
Unknown 16 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 November 2015.
All research outputs
#10,583,123
of 13,292,004 outputs
Outputs from Brazilian Journal of Otorhinolaryngology
#162
of 313 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#241,043
of 354,636 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Brazilian Journal of Otorhinolaryngology
#6
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,292,004 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 313 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.1. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 354,636 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.