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Stuck in the catch 22: attitudes towards smoking cessation among populations vulnerable to social disadvantage

Overview of attention for article published in British Journal of Addiction (to Alcohol & Other Drugs), January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
10 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
56 Mendeley
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Title
Stuck in the catch 22: attitudes towards smoking cessation among populations vulnerable to social disadvantage
Published in
British Journal of Addiction (to Alcohol & Other Drugs), January 2016
DOI 10.1111/add.13253
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kelsey Pateman, Pauline Ford, Lisa Fizgerald, Allyson Mutch, Kym Yuke, Billie Bonevski, Coral Gartner

Abstract

To explore how smoking and smoking cessation is perceived within the context of disadvantage, across a broad cross section of defined populations vulnerable to social disadvantage. Qualitative focus groups with participants recruited through community service organisations (CSO). Metropolitan and regional settings in Queensland, Australia. Focus groups were held at the respective CSO facilities. Fifty-six participants across nine focus groups, including people living with mental illness, people experiencing or at risk of homelessness (adult and youth populations), people living with HIV, people living in a low income area and Indigenous Australians. Thematic, in-depth analysis of focus group discussions. Participant demographic information and smoking history was recorded. Smoking behaviour, smoking identity and feelings about smoking were reflective of individual circumstances and social and environmental context. Participants felt 'trapped' in smoking because they felt unable to control the stressful life circumstances that triggered and sustained their smoking. Smoking cessation was viewed as an individual's responsibility, which was at odds with participants' statements about the broader factors outside of their own control that were responsible for their smoking. Highly disadvantaged smokers' views on smoking involve contradictions between feeling that smoking cessation involves personal responsibility while at the same time feeling trapped by stressful life circumstances. Tobacco control programs aiming to reduce smoking among disadvantaged groups are unlikely to be successful unless the complex interplay of social factors is carefully considered. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 56 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Canada 1 2%
Unknown 54 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 12 21%
Student > Master 11 20%
Student > Bachelor 9 16%
Unspecified 7 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 11%
Other 11 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 13 23%
Social Sciences 10 18%
Unspecified 10 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 13%
Other 9 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 May 2016.
All research outputs
#2,700,206
of 12,521,282 outputs
Outputs from British Journal of Addiction (to Alcohol & Other Drugs)
#1,859
of 4,242 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#70,170
of 344,286 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Journal of Addiction (to Alcohol & Other Drugs)
#40
of 73 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,521,282 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 78th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,242 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 344,286 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 73 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.