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Adiponectin is associated with poor prognosis in carcinoma patients: evidence from a meta-analysis

Overview of attention for article published in Lipids in Health and Disease, November 2015
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Title
Adiponectin is associated with poor prognosis in carcinoma patients: evidence from a meta-analysis
Published in
Lipids in Health and Disease, November 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12944-015-0157-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jiaxiang Ye, Zhongguo Liang, Qian Liang, Jinyan Zhang, Sufei Mao, Rui Liang

Abstract

Studies have come to conflicting conclusions about whether adiponectin (APN) expression is associated with cancer prognosis. To help resolve this question, we meta-analyzed the available evidence. PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, the Chinese Biological Medical Database and the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure Database were systematically searched to identify all eligible studies examining APN expression and prognosis for patients with any type of cancer. Pooled hazard ratios (HRs) and corresponding 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) related to overall survival (OS) or disease-free survival (DFS) were calculated. Ten studies involving 999 patients were meta-analyzed. Analysis across all patients revealed no significant association between high/positive APN expression and DFS, but they did show a significant association between high/positive APN expression and OS (HR 1.51, 95 %CI 1.21 to 1.89). Subgroup analysis showed that high/positive APN expression in non-Asians was significantly associated with both DFS (HR 1.36, 95 % CI 1.03 to 1.80) and OS (HR 1.53, 95 %CI 1.20 to 1.96), but no such associations were observed in Asians. In addition, high/positive APN expression was significantly associated with OS across all patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HR 1.89, 95 %CI 1.20 to 2.98). The available evidence suggests that high/positive APN expression is associated with poor prognosis for patients with various carcinomas, especially for non-Asian cancer patients and for all patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. These findings should be confirmed and extended in large, well-designed studies.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 4 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 4 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 1 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 25%
Student > Bachelor 1 25%
Lecturer 1 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 1 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 25%
Social Sciences 1 25%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 November 2015.
All research outputs
#11,081,346
of 12,463,059 outputs
Outputs from Lipids in Health and Disease
#736
of 898 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#276,748
of 339,019 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Lipids in Health and Disease
#74
of 98 outputs
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